Navajo Nation won’t back tribal energy company’s coal mines

COAL: The Navajo Nation’s president says the tribe will not financially back bonds the Navajo Transitional Energy Company needs for its newly acquired trio of Cloud Peak coal mines in Wyoming and Montana. (Associated Press)

ALSO: The conflict over a coal export terminal in Oakland, California, represents a deeper rift between land-locked Western fossil fuel-producing states and coastal states over climate policies and commerce. (InsideClimate News)

***SPONSORED LINK: Attend Law Seminars International’s annual, Tribal Energy in the SW Conference, November 21-22, in Albuquerque. The conference will focus on the transition to clean power and new opportunities for Tribal Energy Projects. Register today!

Permian Basin oil boom could worsen Western water stress

OIL & GAS: A think tank’s report warns that the Permian Basin oil boom could worsen water shortages in drought-prone parts of the West. (Reuters)

ALSO:
• Permian Basin shale companies are preparing to pump less oil and natural gas as financial pressures mount. (Wall Street Journal, subscription)
• Occidental Petroleum is soliciting bids for oil and gas properties in Wyoming and Colorado and plans to sell its office building in the heart of the Permian Basin. (Reuters, Houston Chronicle)

***SPONSORED LINK: Attend Law Seminars International’s annual, Tribal Energy in the SW Conference, November 21-22, in Albuquerque. The conference will focus on the transition to clean power and new opportunities for Tribal Energy Projects.

Coal company contractor desecrated sacred Native American ground

COAL: Crow Nation members say a coal company contractor working under federal oversight in Montana desecrated one of the largest known Native American bison killing grounds to make way for a coal mine. (Associated Press)

ALSO:
• The owners of the Navajo Generating Station confirm it will shut down this week after burning through its remaining coal supply. (Cronkite News)
• A plan to pair Montana’s Hardin Generating Station with a Bitcoin mine appears to have stalled, with no construction done on slated data-server warehouses. (Billings Gazette)

***SPONSORED LINK: Attend Law Seminars International’s annual, Tribal Energy in the SW Conference, November 21-22, in Albuquerque. The conference will focus on the transition to clean power and new opportunities for Tribal Energy Projects.

Utility-scale solar accelerating on Southwestern tribal lands

SOLAR: A new report finds that utility-scale solar installations are accelerating on tribal lands in the Southwest due in part to the emergence of battery-storage technology, policy changes, and falling prices. (T&D World)

ALSO: Developers have reached a power purchase agreement for a 200-megawatt solar project in Kern County, California. (Power Engineering)

CLEAN ENERGY: New modeling shows that of all states, Colorado may be the best prepared for a large-scale transition to clean energy — with the cleanest of three scenarios being the cheapest. (Vox)

UTILITIES: Xcel Energy-Colorado faces questions about its fossil fuel spending as the company argues for a rate increase with state regulators. (Denver Post)

CALIFORNIA:
• PG&E faces $6.3 billion in bankruptcy and wildfire costs this year, including possibly having to pay bankers and certain stock owners $1 billion in fees for arranging a bankruptcy exit plan.

Solar installer: California outages have ‘reset the market’

CALIFORNIA: A solar installer says power shutoffs in California have “reset” the market: “consumers who didn’t purchase in the past…are re-evaluating that decision.” (Greentech Media)

ALSO:
• Placer County, California officials blame PG&E, the state, and the Bureau of Land Management for emergency proclamations, saying lands have not been properly managed and the state and feds “have done an abysmal job with fuel management.” (Roseville Today)
• A Davis, California power provider says its $300 million offer to buy PG&E’s electric assets in Yolo County is fair and still open for discussion. (Sacramento Business Journal)
• Battery systems installed by a Vermont utility kept the lights on for 1,100 customers during a blackout in that state last month, providing a possible model for grid resiliency in California. (Greentech Media)
• California has dedicated funding since 2017 to help disadvantaged communities install solar batteries, but no installations have been completed. (High Country News)

POLITICS: Utah Sen. Mitt Romney joins the Senate Climate Caucus, calling for “productive bipartisan dialogue” on the issue. (Salt Lake Tribune)

OIL & GAS:
• A new study finds a small number of leaking pipes in California are responsible for a third of the state’s methane emissions.