Midwest flooding increases Keystone XL pipeline risks, opponents say

WIND: An agreement between Ohio regulatory staff and an offshore wind developer over bird and bat monitoring could allow a 20.7 MW demonstration project in Lake Erie to move forward. (Energy News Network)

ALSO:
• A new developer takes over plans for a western Minnesota wind project after a dispute over the former owner’s hiring practices. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• State regulators approve plans for a 310 MW wind project in eastern South Dakota. (Watertown Public Opinion)
• An Indianapolis wind developer posts a $22.9 million loss in the first quarter due to acquisitions and finishing weather-delayed projects. (Indianapolis Business Journal)

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Ohio lawmakers walk out of nuclear subsidy hearing

SOLAR: Utilities in Nebraska and Missouri see strong interest from customers for their solar subscription programs. (Energy News Network)

POLICY:
• Ohio Democrats walk out of a hearing on legislation to subsidize two nuclear plants after a lawmaker was not allowed to ask questions of bill supporters. (Toledo Blade)
• Electric vehicles, nuclear subsidies and statewide clean energy goals are among energy policy issues to watch in the Midwest. (E&E News, subscription)

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WIND:
• Wind energy is a booming job sector in North Dakota.

Wisconsin utility pledges net-zero carbon by 2050

SOLAR: A western Michigan solar developer uses a federal tax incentive to build projects and provide job-training in low-income communities. (Energy News Network)

ALSO:
• The Indiana Municipal Power Agency plans its largest solar project to date, a 9.9 MW project near Indianapolis. (Crawfordsville Journal Review)
• A northern Illinois city is recognized for its commitment to solar power. (WREX)
• A training facility for the Indianapolis Colts football team will install solar panels in the coming months. (Inside Indiana Business)
• County officials in eastern Iowa near the completion of zoning regulations for large-scale solar projects.

Indiana gas plant rejection part of growing trend

SOLAR: Minnesota nonprofits partner with developers to bring community solar to low-income residents. (Energy News Network)

ALSO:
• A rural Indiana couple is among a group of residents fighting a proposed 850-acre solar project near Indianapolis. (Anderson Herald Bulletin)
• A St. Paul, Minnesota, installer expands as the state maintains a focus on solar energy. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• A municipal utility in northern Michigan considers power purchase agreements for two solar projects.

Illinois lawmaker proposes $1,000 annual fee for EV drivers

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:  Illinois legislation would raise annual electric vehicle registration fees to $1,000, which electric vehicle manufacturers say would discourage EV purchases and drivers call “outrageous.” (Chicago Tribune)

ALSO:
• Advocates say Michigan needs a long-term road-funding plan that doesn’t place high fees on electric vehicle drivers. (MiBiz)
• Residents in Ann Arbor, Michigan, press local officials to open a curbside electric vehicle charging station. (MLive)

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OIL & GAS: North Dakota prepares to sue Washington state over a new law requiring oil moved by rail to have fewer volatile gases.