CLIMATE: As Kansas City ramps up a process for updating the city’s climate action plan, stakeholders say they hope the revision will be more inclusive, better funded, and hold leaders more accountable than the original. (Energy News Network)

CLEAN ENERGY:
• The passage of Illinois’ sweeping clean energy law this week highlighted key political debates in the clean energy transition. (Inside Climate News)
• A local chapter of Franciscan Sisters in Minnesota will provide grants of up to $1,000 for local clean energy projects. (St. Cloud Times)

PIPELINES:
• Minnesota officials fine Enbridge $3.32 million for environmental violations that damaged an aquifer and endangered wetlands during Line 3 construction. (Star Tribune)
Enbridge’s head of security previously managed Exxon Mobil’s response to protests in Nigeria and helped oversee an Amazon division that has used social media to monitor labor and environmental groups. (The Intercept)
• North Dakota’s attorney general says more time is needed to negotiate with federal officials over law enforcement costs related to Dakota Access pipeline protests. (Associated Press)
• Canadian officials continue to argue in U.S. federal court that the Keystone XL pipeline should still move forward. (Reuters)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Ford plans to invest $250 million and add 450 jobs to produce the electrified version of its F-150 truck. (Detroit News)
• General Motors announces an extended pause on Chevrolet Bolt production as the company resolves battery defects. (Electrek)

SOLAR:
• Developers face local opposition during a public hearing on a proposed utility-scale solar project in Wisconsin. (Green Bay Press-Gazette)
• Ohio regulators approve plans for a more than 100 MW solar project. (Crescent News)

OHIO: An Ohio state senator who led efforts to repeal the state’s scandal-tainted power plant subsidy law faces a difficult reelection after new political districts are drawn. (Ohio Capital Journal)

COAL: Springfield, Illinois, residents and advocates want to know why the city didn’t use a citywide text alert system to notify people about a recent accidental release of coal fly ash from a local coal plant. (WICS)

UTILITIES: Local officials in Ohio move forward with plans to analyze the effectiveness of its municipally owned utility. (Youngstown Vindicator)

COMMENTARY: A Wisconsin researcher and a lead author on a recent climate change assessment says climate-related infrastructure investments are needed quickly. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

Andy Balaskovitz

Andy compiles the Midwest Energy News digest and was a journalism fellow for Midwest Energy News from 2014-2020. He is managing editor of MiBiz in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and was formerly a reporter and editor at City Pulse, Lansing’s alternative newsweekly.