COAL: American Electric Power subsidiaries consider whether to close a West Virginia coal-fired power plant in 2028 or make investments to keep it open longer. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

COAL ASH: Texas’ push to take over regulation of coal ash disposal could insulate the coal industry from more aggressive regulation under President-elect Biden. (Texas Tribune)

UTILITIES:
• The Jacksonville City Council releases an investigation showing the Florida city’s former mayor skirted sunshine laws during a three-year effort to sell JEA, the taxpayer-owned electric utility. (Jacksonville Daily Record)
• Dominion Energy begins making its case for higher rates to South Carolina regulators in hearings expected to run from today through Friday. (The State)

OIL & GAS:
• The outgoing Trump administration extends five natural gas export licenses for terminals in Florida, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas through 2050. (Natural Gas Intelligence)
• West Virginia’s coal, oil and natural gas severance taxes fell far short of projections last month and were down 62% from December 2019. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)
• Atlanta-based Gas South acquires another company to become the largest retail natural gas provider in the Southeast. (Natural Gas Intelligence)
• A maker of pipes and tubes used by the oil and natural gas industry lays off 185 workers at a Texas plant. (Freight Waves)

SOLAR:
• Texas signs off on tax incentives for a planned 206 MW solar farm. (Houston Business Journal)
• A Florida county board looks set to confirm a previous vote to prevent a 74.5 MW solar project proposed by Gulf Power. (Northwest Florida Daily News)
• A southern Virginia planning commission denies a proposal to convert a golf course into a solar farm. (Martinsville Bulletin)

OVERSIGHT: Lame-duck President Donald Trump renominates a Tennessee Valley Authority board member after shaking up the body last year by removing two members, including its chairman. (Chattanooga Times Free Press)

COMMENTARY: A Florida risk consultant talks climate change and what homeowners and state lawmakers can do to prepare for conditions in 2100. (South Florida Sun Sentinel/Florida Climate Reporting Network)

 

Dan Haugen

Dan Haugen

Dan has two decades' experience working in print, digital and broadcast media. Prior to joining the Energy News Network as managing editor in December 2017, he oversaw watchdog reporting at the Sioux Falls Argus Leader, part of the USA Today Network, and before that spent several years as a freelance journalist covering energy, business and technology. Dan is a former Midwest Energy News journalism fellow and a member of Investigative Reporters and Editors. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and mass communications from University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.