U.S. Energy News

After pipeline protests, tribes make push for solar

SOLAR: Three years after the Dakota Access pipeline protests in North Dakota, tribes are pushing for more solar energy in the region. (Rolling Stone)

ALSO:
California is producing more solar energy than it needs and new research suggests the surplus power could drive down electricity rates. (Los Angeles Times)
Nevada’s governor signs a bill directing the state’s largest utility to develop programs offering solar energy to low-income residents. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)
• Anheuser-Busch signs a power purchase agreement for a 222 MW solar project to help it meet its goal to purchase 100% renewable energy. (Greentech Media)

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OFFSHORE WIND:
• Avangrid expects a flurry of activity in the U.S. offshore wind market this year as it prepares to build its first large project off the Massachusetts coast. (Greentech Media)
• U.S. offshore wind development is happening too quickly to understand its effects on coastal fisheries, according to some researchers. (WNPR)
• U.S. Rep. Bill Keating reintroduces federal legislation to help colleges and universities develop worker training for the offshore wind industry. (Standard-Times)

COAL:
• A provision in a North Carolina ratemaking bill could offer a financing model to help Duke Energy close its coal-fired power plants sooner rather than later. (Energy News Network)
• A report by environmental groups says West Virginia coal mines have released as much as 220 times the allowable amounts of pollutants into waterways without being penalized. (Reuters)
• The coal processing chemical that spilled into West Virginia’s Elk River in 2014 could harm fetus development, according to a federal study on test animals. (Bloomberg)
A Wyoming town tries to imagine life without coal at its center as a local plant faces a possible early closure. (Marketplace)

PIPELINES:
• Enbridge’s timeline to replace Line 3 in Minnesota could be pushed back further after a ruling from a state appeals court. (MinnPost)
• Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer wants to reach a “conceptual agreement” with Enbridge within a week about the future of Line 5. (Detroit News)
• New Jersey regulators are set to rule on several permits for an undersea natural gas pipeline that was recently rejected by their counterparts in New York. (Associated Press)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Fully electric vehicles, including electric SUVs, could account for 7.6% of U.S. car sales in 2026, according to a consultancy’s forecast. (Axios)
Colorado officials say they will move forward with plans to adopt California’s zero emissions vehicle standards after talks with an auto manufacturers group failed to produce a voluntary deal. (Reuters)

EFFICIENCY:
• A well-known political hire and former critic of renewable energy is promoted to lead the U.S. Department of Energy’s efficiency programs. (E&E News)
• A San Francisco startup closes a $32.6 million growth round to expand its sensors-and-software-driven approach to reducing building energy use. (Greentech Media)

RENEWABLES: Elected officials will discuss a proposal to turn Rikers Island in New York City into a renewable energy center as its jail complex is expected to close within a decade. (Astoria Post)

BIOFUEL: Bates College in Maine achieves carbon neutrality after switching to a biocrude heating fuel made from wood waste. (Energy News Network)

CITIES: Cleveland is among U.S. cities with a strong push for clean energy despite a lack of federal and statewide policy. (GreenBiz)

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CLIMATE: An attorney representing young plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the U.S. government over climate change says that federal energy policies “put children in harm’s way.” (Associated Press)

COMMENTARY:
A clean energy analyst says coal plants in competitive wholesale markets are being run uneconomically and accrue significant losses for months at a time that are paid by utility customers. (Union of Concerned Scientists)
• A Loyola economics professor says when it comes to coal, President Trump seems to care more about politics than free-market principles. (New York Times)

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