U.S. Energy News

Another solar company says it’s leaving Nevada

SOLAR: Another major solar company is taking operations— and hundreds of jobs — out of Nevada after the state made changes to net metering policies. Earlier this week, its rival company announced more than 500 jobs would be leaving. (Reuters)

ALSO:
 A proposed amendment to the Florida Constitution backed by utilities that effectively blocks rooftop solar appears to have enough signatures to get on the November ballot. (Utility Dive)
While community solar appears to have widespread support, experts are unclear about the model’s future. (Utility Dive)
• Analysts now see strong industry growth into the 2020s with the extension of federal tax credits. (Utility Dive)

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CLIMATE:
• EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy says 2016 “is not an opportunity to relax,” adding that the administration seeks to lock in more climate efforts this year. (Washington Post)
Recent reports suggest Ohio may be ill-prepared for dealing with climate change impacts. (Midwest Energy News)

COAL:
• The amount of coal generation in the Southwest Power Pool has dropped 10 percent in the past two years, displaced largely by wind and natural gas. (Utility Dive)
• Exports from Virginia dropped 34.8 percent from 2014 and are at the lowest point since 2007 due to declining prices. (Platts)
Coal companies ask a court to block implementation of miners’ protections against respirable coal dust. (SNL)

CLEAN POWER PLAN: The EPA is confident that the landmark federal rules will withstand a legal challenge. (The Hill)

POLITICS: Experts say New Hampshire voters are more likely than ever to select a presidential candidate who believes climate change is a hoax. (ClimateWire)

HYDRO: Major hydroelectric dams are being built in developing countries with little consideration for the climate and biodiversity impacts. (Climate Central)

FRACKING:
• With two of the largest earthquakes in recent years happening in Oklahoma this week, experts are concerned it’s a sign of larger ones to come. (New York Times)
Members of the U.S. EPA’s Science Advisory Board are raising questions about a department report on fracking from last year, calling its findings ambiguous and in need of clarification. (Bloomberg)

TRANSMISSION: Vermont regulators approve siting for a new $1.2 billion transmission line to bring wind and hydroelectric power from Canada to the Northeast. (Greentech Media)

BIOFUELS: The U.S. Navy is set to launch a fleet of ships that will be supported by more than 77 million gallons of a non-food biofuel blend. (Biofuels Digest)

KEYSTONE XL: Legal experts say TransCanada may have a decent chance at winning one or both lawsuits against the Obama administration for rejecting the Keystone XL project. (Greenwire)

METHANE:
• The methane leak from a natural gas storage site in California has so far cost the utility $50 million. (Associated Press)
• ConocoPhillips has made major reductions in methane emissions in New Mexico in recent years even as production continued to climb. (EnergyWire)

NUCLEAR: Wisconsin lawmakers are expected to vote on a bill next week to lift the state’s moratorium on new nuclear plants. (Associated Press)

RENEWABLES: There is consensus within the wind and solar industries that further tax-credit extensions are unlikely after the current ones are phased out. (Forbes)

BIOMASS: Maine’s logging industry is concerned that up to 2,500 jobs could be lost after a company announces two biomass plants will close in March. (Portland Press Herald)

CORRECTION: An item in Tuesday’s digest misstated the year a coalition aims to eliminate the sale of gasoline cars. The year is 2050, not 2015.

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