Southeast Energy News

Arkansas wind transmission project shelved after political opposition

WIND: A developer shelves plans for a controversial power line across Arkansas following political opposition to the $2.5 billion project, which would have moved 4,000 MW of wind power from Oklahoma to Tennessee. (Arkansas Business News)

ALSO: A politically controversial wind farm is now the biggest property taxpayer in two rural North Carolina counties. It recently delivered big cardboard checks to prove it. (Southeast Energy News)

NUCLEAR:
• South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster says SCE&G should take on the costs of its failed nuclear project after an audit casts doubt on its claim that it would go bankrupt doing so. (Post and Courier)
• Meanwhile, McMaster tells South Carolina lawmakers he’ll sign legislation that blocks SCE&G from continuing to charge customers for the now-failed Summer nuclear project. (The State)
• A consumer watchdog group wants state utility regulators to reconsider their decision allowing Georgia Power to continue its delayed, over-budget Vogtle nuclear plant project. (E&E News, registration)

SOLAR:
• An analysis shows Southern states like Texas, Florida and South Carolina are among the most significantly impacted by President Trump’s tariffs on imported solar panels and modules. (Green Tech Media)
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Tariffs approved by President Trump could significantly harm North Carolina’s solar power production, which is second in the country behind California. (WRAL)
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A solar farm in North Carolina is bracing for the effects of a new tariff on imported solar cells and modules. (New York Times)
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Some Georgia companies worry solar import tariffs will lead to job cuts there while the state’s solar advocates and installers have mixed reviews on the new tariff. (WABE, Savannah Now)
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Tariffs on imported panels and modules are expected to increases costs for Florida Power & Light’s utility-scale solar projects and for rooftop solar for Florida’s homes and businesses. (Palm Beach Post)
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Arkansas’s largest municipal solar array is now complete and, ahead of new import tariffs, was made mostly with imported parts. (KUAR)

COAL: State regulators will vote Feb. 6 on a settlement over Mississippi Power’s significantly over-budget Kemper “clean-coal” plant, which, if approved, would mean a rate reduction for residential customers. (Mississippi Business Journal)

COAL ASH: Environmentalists have concerns over Georgia Power’s coal ash cleanup. (WABE)

CLIMATE: After experiencing flooding in Florida from Hurricane Irma, a 10 year old sues the federal government for supporting the continued use of fossil fuels that contribute to climate change. (WBFO)

OFFSHORE DRILLING: A Republican lawmaker who represents part of Georgia’s coast calls for more public input on President Trump’s plan to expand offshore drilling. (WABE)

UTILITIES: Duke Energy Progress will give $2.5 million in energy assistance to low-income families as a partial settlement in the utility’s 10.8 percent rate hike case in North Carolina. (Charlotte Business Journal)

OIL: A Louisiana professor and his research team have been awarded more than $533,000 to study the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s long-term impacts on wetlands. (WAFB)

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