Northeast Energy News

At U.N., Maine governor says state to become carbon neutral by 2045

CLIMATE: Maine Gov. Janet Mills addresses the United Nations General Assembly and says the state will become carbon neutral by 2045. (Associated Press)

ALSO:
• At a gathering in New York, oil company executives say they are serious about climate change but present plans that seem mostly intended to further reliance on fossil fuels. (New York Times)
• Activists shut down several Washington D.C. intersections during the Monday morning commute to draw attention to climate change. (WBAL)
• Members of the new state-sponsored Maine Climate Council discuss the challenges they face and the efforts of the body. (Maine Public)
• Three Pittsburgh institutions, a university and two health care systems, explain how they are cutting emissions. (PublicSource.org)
• Legislators at a hearing express frustration with Massachusetts state officials at the pace of policy developments to combat climate change. (Taunton Daily Gazette)

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SOLAR: A proposal to expand solar in Massachusetts would reduce incentives to build projects on greenfield sites. (Energy News Network)

OFFSHORE WIND: New York officials will work with offshore wind counterparts in Ireland and Denmark to improve grid reliability, infrastructure and workforce development. (Albany Times Union)

PIPELINES: A federal agency today will discuss and vote on the final report on a fatal gas pipeline explosion in Massachusetts a year ago. (WCVB)

EFFICIENCY: Delaware regulators approve a suite of energy efficiency measures that could save an average customer $10 a month. (Cape Gazette)

DISTRIBUTED ENERGY: Utilities and distributed energy resource providers are becoming collaborators in the Northeast as they seek to shave peak loads. (Utility Dive)

STORAGE:
• At an energy storage session at a New Hampshire energy summit, a developer says residents are “adopting it like crazy” despite its high cost. (Concord Monitor)
• Panelists tell a New Jersey forum that storage faces challenges from outdated regulations and its inability to attract financing. (NJ Spotlight)

EMISSIONS: A New Hampshire legislative will hold a work session on a proposed bill that would set a price on carbon emissions. (NHPR)

UTILITIES: Vermont regulators approve a complex utility ownership deal between Canadian companies with stakes in state utilities that critics say could lead to more natural gas pipelines in the state. (VPR)

NATURAL GAS: A state report says natural gas royalties in Pennsylvania  topped $1.64 billion last year, the highest during the current nine-year boom. (Pittsburgh Business Times)

COAL: Although sometimes difficult, communities can find new uses for closed coal power plants, a redeveloper says. (Yale Climate Connections)

COMMENTARY:
• A climate activist who disrupted traffic in a Washington D.C. protest says fighting climate change demands radical action from ordinary citizens who are not accustomed to taking them. (Washington Post)
• A solar and storage developer in New York says Long Island is a model for the state as it seeks to build clean resources closer to where energy is consumed, reducing the need for large transmission infrastructure projects. (Albany Times Union)

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