Southeast Energy News

Bankrupt coal company retracts paychecks from workers’ bank accounts

PIPELINES:
• Community leaders in Yogaville, Virginia, invest in solar energy while opposing construction of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. (Energy News Network)
• Communities along the Atlantic Coast Pipeline’s route are divided over the economic benefits lost while construction is halted. (WVPB)
• Texas, Louisiana, and Tennessee are among a growing number of states adopting laws criminalizing anti-pipeline activism. (The Guardian)
Kyle, Texas, adopts an ordinance requiring additional permits and fees for pipeline construction and prohibits certain types of buildings near pipelines. (Community Impact Newspaper)

COAL:
Coal company Blackjewel deducted miners’ paychecks from their bank accounts after filing for bankruptcy on July 1. (Lexington Herald-Leader)
• A federal judge will allow Blackjewel to borrow $5 million to navigate bankruptcy on the condition that its CEO step down. (WVPB)

OIL & GAS:
• West Virginia University researchers test an idea to save water by combining wastewater from power plants and fracking. (Associated Press)
• Texas oil and gas fields are breaking records for production, according to a report from a natural gas industry group. (Midland Reporter-Telegram)
• The Supreme Court of Texas rules that the plain language of a contract outweighs industry custom in an oil drilling case. (Houston Chronicle) 

OFFSHORE DRILLING:
• Sixteen South Carolina coastal communities write a letter to health and environmental conservation officials opposing seismic testing. (Bluffton Today)
• A Florida state representative introduces a proposal to ban energy exploration in the South Atlantic and extend the moratorium in the Gulf of Mexico through 2029. (Sunshine State News)

SOLAR:
• Florida Power & Light tried to exclude homeowners who supported energy deregulation from its solar program, but deleted the clause in a proposal after questions from regulators. (Miami Herald)
• Political influence by big utilities has discouraged Florida homeowners from installing solar panels. (New York Times)
Solar energy expands in South Carolina in the few months since a law was passed to spur the industry’s growth. (WCBD)
• Duke Energy now owns 1 GW of solar energy capacity. (WRAL)
• An Arkansas telecommunications provider will use energy generated by a new solar farm to power its operations. (Courier News)

NUCLEAR:
• Georgia Power moves forward with construction at Plant Vogtle. (Daily Energy Insider)
• South Carolina could be stuck with a massive stockpile of dangerous nuclear material for decades, despite a federal mandate to get rid of it. (Post and Courier)

EMISSIONS: Kentucky colleges have ambitious climate goals but are struggling to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. (Courier Journal)

UTILITIES:
• Georgia Power primarily uses natural gas, coal and nuclear, but the utility board is deciding on the company’s long-term plan, which might add more renewables. (Georgia Public Broadcasting)
• The Tennessee Valley Authority releases its long-term energy plan, which says it will add 14 GW of solar by 2038 and increase energy efficiency. (Knoxville News Sentinel)

COMMENTARY: A Duke-backed bill will raise electricity rates for customers and profits for the utility, a manufacturing executive writes. (News & Observer)

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