U.S. Energy News

Billions in gas projects could be stranded by climate action

STRANDED GAS: More than $280 billion of liquefied natural gas projects planned over the next decade risk being “stranded” if global action is taken to limit climate change to 2°C, according to Carbon Tracker. (The Guardian)

SOLAR:
The Obama administration will announce today an initiative to help low- and middle-income Americans gain access to solar energy. (The New York Times)
An Ohio auto dealer has installed what it says is the largest solar canopy of its type erected by any automobile dealership in the country. (Midwest Energy News)

FRACKING: Refracking shale oil fields could yield enough reserves to last about 50 years, according to research data. (Bloomberg)

CLEAN POWER PLAN: The Sierra Club launched a week-long advertising campaign Monday to slam Republican Senator Mark Kirk of Illinois for voting to scrap the EPA’s carbon limits for power plants. (The Hill)

WIND: Three New England utilities will share the energy produced by a new wind farm expected to bring 185 megawatts and 400 construction jobs to the region. (FierceEnergy)

JOBS: Paris-based oil equipment builder Technip, which has its main U.S. offices in Houston, plans to cut about 6,000 jobs to cope with the oil industry downturn. (FuelFix)

OIL TRAINS:
Environmental and safety groups are planning a week of protests against transporting crude oil by train. (The Hill)
On Monday, as many as 100 people rallied in Albany to call on New York’s governor to ban oil train traffic in the state. (Times Union)

METHANE: A group of mothers and their children from Moms Clean Air Force will descend on Capitol Hill Tuesday for a “play-in” to support upcoming methane regulations from the EPA. (The Hill)

UTILITIES: Although 34 percent of Americans surveyed by Gallup said they worry a “great deal” about the environment, that has not translated into a mass exodus from conventional power suppliers. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

EFFICIENCY: Self-driving “robocab” taxis could deliver huge environmental and economic benefits by running more efficiently than privately operated vehicles, a study says. (Press Association)

FREE CARS: The incentives are so generous in a California pilot program to put low-income drivers behind the wheels of energy-efficient cars that, in the right situation, a car can be had for free. (Money)

EMISSIONS GAP:
Analyses of greenhouse gas targets submitted to the U.N. make it clear the cuts won’t be enough, at least initially, to avert catastrophic climate change. (ClimateWire)
The emissions gap between international pledges to cut carbon and the amount of action needed to prevent catastrophic climate change can be almost entirely addressed through local action, a new report says. (The Guardian)

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