U.S. Energy News

California governor vetoes bill to slow Trump rollbacks

OVERSIGHT: California Governor Gavin Newsom stuns environmental advocates by vetoing a bill that would have made it easier for state regulators to counter the Trump administration’s rollback of clean air and endangered species regulations. (Associated Press)

OIL & GAS:
The Interior Department says a comment denying a “climate crisis” had “no bearing” on its broader assessment of the environmental impact of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (E&E News)
• Ohio firefighters continue to be kept in the dark about potentially hazardous chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing. (Energy News Network)

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RENEWABLES:
• A longtime environmental advocate in Virginia the state is in a better position than ever to transition to clean energy, but a plan by Gov. Ralph Northam lacks specific goals. (Energy News Network)
• After passing a resolution to transition to 100% renewable energy in 2018, a committee in Norman, Oklahoma, sets a timeline and priorities for the upcoming year. (Associated Press)

SOLAR:
Xcel Energy says a new 240 MW solar farm at a Pueblo, Colorado steel mill should be up and running by 2021. (Denver Post)
Farmers in California’s San Joaquin Valley see solar farms as a lucrative new cash crop to counter chronic water shortages and as water supplies shrink under the states groundwater law. (Sacramento Bee)

OFFSHORE WIND: At an energy forum in Boston, the head of the federal agency that has delayed the permit for Vineyard Wind refuses to say when its review will be complete. (Commonwealth Magazine)

BIOFUELS: Northeastern heating oil dealers will press for state mandates to include some biofuels added to home heating oil to help them reach their carbon reduction goals. (Energy News Network)

PIPELINES: As the Supreme Court begins a new session, the justices could decide to wade into four major pipeline fights. (E&E News, subscription)

EFFICIENCY:
• Americans are willing to go only so far when it comes to changing habits to conserve energy and reduce emissions, a new poll suggests. (Associated Press)
• In Florida and the U.S., energy efficiency jobs are outpacing jobs in the solar or electric vehicle industries, a report from a business group shows. (Tampa Bay Times)

COAL:
Navajo leaders say they were never informed about Navajo Transitional Energy Company’s purchase of Cloud Peak’s Wyoming coal mines, and it “cannot and should not be supported.” (Navajo Times)
• The Tennessee Valley Authority demolishes a coal plant in Alabama that ceased operations in 2015, and the utility is preparing the site for economic development. (AL.com)
• Norton, Virginia, city officials grow the area’s outdoor recreation industry to power the city’s post-coal economy. (Ohio Valley Resource)

COAL ASH: A new Illinois law regulating coal ash storage and cleanup will face its first test with two of the state’s most notorious storage sites. (Energy News Network)

REGULATION: The nation’s top utility regulator acknowledges frustration of various groups due to his agency’s inability to resolve a stalemate over the contentious PJM capacity market. (Greentech Media)

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ACTIVISM: Sixty-seven climate protestors are arrested for trespassing at a New Hampshire coal power in the largest display of civil disobedience in the state in decades. (Union Leader)

COMMENTARY:
• Fossil fuel companies are likely to face a decades-long, metaphorical game of musical chairs as demand declines, an energy columnist writes. (Axios)
• A Florida scientist describes his experience with solar and energy storage he installed after Hurricane Irma to better prepare for storms like Hurricane Dorian. (CleanTechnica) 

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