OIL & GAS: The EPA revokes a permit for an oil refinery in the U.S. Virgin Islands, citing years of air and water pollution affecting the largely Black and Hispanic surrounding community. (Inside Climate News)

ALSO:
• The leading oil and gas industry lobbying group says it supports a carbon tax, but some Republican lawmakers aren’t on board, while environmental groups call the announcement “self-serving greenwashing.” (Washington Post; E&E News, subscription)
• Interior Secretary Deb Haaland defends the Biden administration’s pause on new oil and gas drilling leases in a hearing, while Indigenous leaders warn against “overly broad responses to the climate crisis.” (The Hill)
• Oil companies are winning approval to build massive crude tanks, largely in communities of color, despite states’ clean energy pledges. (Capital & Main)
• Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., sets a vote to reinstate Obama-era methane emissions regulations. (E&E News, subscription)

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SOLAR: The Department of Energy announces a goal of cutting solar energy costs by 60% over the next decade, along with $70 million in funding for solar cell development. (Axios)

TRANSPORTATION:
Congressional Democrats call on President Biden to reinstate — and then go beyond — Obama-era emissions and mileage standards for passenger cars, as well as set a 2035 end date for the sale of fossil fuel-powered vehicles. (Axios)
A bipartisan group of senators introduces a bill to expand a tax credit for building electric vehicle charging infrastructure, saying the current benefit isn’t adequate to encourage private investment. (The Hill)

GRID:
The number of people reported dead after last month’s winter storm and outages has more than doubled the initial count to 111, according to a Texas agency. (CNN)
• California regulators approve utilities’ plans to cut power when the grid is stressed, aiming to prevent a repeat of last summer’s rolling blackouts. (San Francisco Chronicle)

WIND: New Jersey regulators approve $13 million to begin construction of an offshore wind hub while also approving a unit of the state’s largest utility buying a 25% stake in the first project planned along its coast. (NJ Spotlight) 

CLIMATE:
• The National Academies makes a case for the U.S. government to spend at least $100 million launching a new solar geoengineering research program. (Grist)
• Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker says he will sign a sweeping climate bill passed by the legislature earlier this month. (WBUR)

PIPELINES: Recent protests have uncovered a complicated history between the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and the Line 3 pipeline. (MPR News)

NUCLEAR: The Nuclear Energy Institute raises concerns about impending nuclear plant shutdowns, saying “carbon emitting sources will likely fill the gap” they leave behind. (Utility Dive)

UTILITIES: An Illinois coalition seeks utility ethics and regulatory reforms and restitution for ComEd ratepayers as part of major energy legislation being considered by state lawmakers. (Energy News Network)

TRANSMISSION: An underground transmission line proposed from Iowa to Illinois is delayed by a glut of renewable energy projects in grid operator PJM’s queue  — a problem that, ironically, the project could help solve. (Energy News Network)

BIOMASS: The growing biomass industry is becoming an economic force in the Southeast but still faces skepticism from federal regulators and the Biden administration. (Politico Magazine)

EFFICIENCY: A Vermont city delays requiring weatherization of rental properties citing concerns that it would create a bottleneck for an agency helping property owners to comply. (Energy News Network)

COMMENTARY: Journalists investigating utilities play an important role in holding wide-ranging, often opaque entities to public account, writes an investigative editor. (ProPublica)