U.S. Energy News

Clean energy tax credits still have a shot in Congress

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CLIMATE:
• Congressional Democrats have a long-shot chance to address climate change this year by attaching clean energy tax credits to a must-pass spending bill. (Vox)
• Exxon’s win in New York is unlikely to affect other climate lawsuits due to the range of legal strategies and theories involved, an expert says. (Grist)

RENEWABLES: Georgetown, Texas, once praised for its aggressive transition to renewable energy, will hire a Shell Oil subsidiary to manage its energy portfolio. (KUT)

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HYDROGEN: Experts see growing potential for hydrogen as a fuel source in the Midwest, particularly for industrial uses. (Energy News Network)

SOLAR:
• Michigan clean energy advocates fear proposed changes to the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act could stifle solar development. (Energy News Network)
• An industry born on residential rooftops is rapidly expanding to open tracts of land and raising concerns in some communities. (E&E News, subscription) 

STORAGE: California regulators propose shifting an energy storage incentive to help customers at highest risk of wildfires and blackouts. (Greentech Media)

OFFSHORE WIND: Three New England states express support for offshore wind in the Gulf of Maine as a task force meets to explore development. (Associated Press)

NUCLEAR:
• An Oregon company’s small modular reactor is a step closer to federal approval as regulators complete an advanced safety evaluation. (Portland Business Journal)
A Minnesota nuclear plant is among multiple environmental concerns for the Prairie Island Indian Community. (MPR News)

PIPELINES:
New U.S. Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette criticizes New York for its refusal to allow new gas pipelines that would bring more fuel into New England. (Reuters)
• Emails show a private security firm hired by Enbridge shared information about pipeline protesters’ activity in Michigan with local law enforcement. (Interlochen Public Radio)
Mountain Valley Pipeline will pay $2.15 million for environmental damage in Virginia and could be fined more for additional violations. (Roanoke Times)

OIL & GAS:
• U.S. energy regulators approve a company’s request to start site preparation work at a proposed liquefied natural gas export project in Louisiana. (Reuters)
• One of Texas’ top oil and gas regulators defends the practice of allowing shale producers to flare natural gas and slams fracking ban proposals. (Bloomberg)
Harold Hamm, who played a major role in the development of North Dakota’s shale oil boom, will step down as CEO of Continental Resources at the end of the year. (Bismarck Tribune)

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UTILITIES: Virginia lawmakers unveil a bill to reestablish state regulators’ authority to set electric rates and profit levels for Dominion Energy. (Washington Post)

COMMENTARY:
• An MIT researcher says batteries are critical to the future but still face limitations, especially in climates with less solar energy available. (PV Magazine)
• An asset manager says New York wasted time and resources in its failed climate suit against Exxon when imposing a carbon tax would have been more effective. (Albany Times Union)

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