CLEAN POWER PLAN: A federal court’s decision to delay a hearing on the Clean Power Plan until September could actually speed up the overall process. (Washington Post)

ALSO: A Justice Department official says the EPA is likely not breaking the law by helping states comply with the plan despite the Supreme Court’s delay. (Bloomberg)

CLIMATE: Attorneys general from Texas and Alabama back Exxon as the company fights an investigation into its climate disclosures. (InsideClimate News)

SOLAR:
• New York’s “full value tariff” could rewrite the rules on rate design for solar. (Greentech Media)
• Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection joins advocates in opposing proposed changes to net metering rules. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)
• Land no longer suitable for farming in California’s Central Valley is eyed for solar development. (KFSN)
• Albuquerque’s city council delays a decision on setting a 25 percent solar energy target. (Associated Press)

WIND:
• Two companies propose deepwater offshore wind projects in Hawaii. (Associated Press)
• Oklahoma lawmakers reject a bill to accelerate the state’s phase-out of wind tax credits. (Oklahoman)
• A $5 billion Wyoming wind project may be in doubt as lawmakers consider raising the state’s tax on wind energy. (Wyoming Business Report)

LABOR: Tesla is under fire for allegedly using cheap foreign labor to expand its California facility. (San Jose Mercury News)

GRID: How a truly national power transmission system might supply cleaner energy to regions lacking those resources and significantly reduce power plant emissions. (The Atlantic)

COAL:
Pro- and anti-coal protesters are expected in force at a hearing on federal leasing in Wyoming today. (Associated Press)
• A report says market forces, not federal rules, are driving the shift away from coal in Texas. (Texas Tribune)
Few options remain for a proposed Washington state coal export terminal to move forward. (SNL Energy)

NUCLEAR:
• Analysts say closure of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant is a major factor behind an increase in carbon emissions in New England. (Boston Globe)
• A proposal to store nuclear waste along Lake Huron is creating political tension between U.S. lawmakers and Canadian officials. (Washington Post)
• The TVA is weighing the development of several designs of small modular reactors near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (Associated Press)
• The activation of the TVA’s Watts Bar 2 reactor this month symbolizes how nuclear energy is simultaneously making a comeback while fading away. (Slate)

UTILITIES: A report says increasing engagement with members will be a key tactic for rural co-ops as they face future energy challenges. (Midwest Energy News)

PIPELINES:
• Developers of the Constitution Pipeline sue New York over rejection of a key permit. (SNL Energy)
• A developer is seeking Warren Buffett’s help for a proposed $1 billion pipeline to carry captured CO2 from Midwest ethanol plants to oil and gas fields in Wyoming. (Omaha World-Herald)

HYDRO:
• A Utah study finds “hydropeaking” – releasing more water to meet peak electricity demand – is damaging river ecosystems. (Deseret News)
• A New York college gets a $1 million grant to develop small hydropower projects. (Poughkeepsie Journal)

COMMENTARY: A letter to middle schoolers on how to stop burning fossil fuels. (Vox)

Ken Paulman

Ken Paulman

Ken is the director of the Energy News Network at Fresh Energy and is a founding editor of both Midwest Energy News and Southeast Energy News. Prior to joining Fresh Energy, he was the managing editor for online news at Minnesota Public Radio. He started his journalism career in 2002 as a copy editor for the Duluth News Tribune before spending five years at the Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, where he worked as a copy editor, online producer, features editor and night city editor. A Nebraska native, Ken has a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a master's degree from the University of Oregon. He is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists and Investigative Reporters and Editors.

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