U.S. Energy News

Coalition wants ‘endgame’ for cars that run on fossil fuels

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: A coalition of cities, states and businesses call for automakers to come up with an “endgame” for cars that run on fossil fuels. (San Francisco Chronicle)

ALSO:
• U.S. electricity demand could increase by as much as 38 percent by 2050 with high EV-adoption rates, according to a new study. (Utility Dive)
• Tesla plans to build a service and delivery center in New Orleans, the first of its kind on the Gulf Coast. (The Advocate)

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SOLAR:
• The solar industry and farmers clash over land use in Washington state. (New York Times)
• Solar panels installed on thrift shops throughout Virginia help Mennonites raise money for global aid programs. (Energy News Network)
• More solar customers are borrowing money to buy panels outright instead of leasing equipment, according to GTM Research. (Greentech Media)

WIND: North Carolina lawmakers adjourned without extending a statewide wind farm moratorium, set to expire Jan. 1, but advocates say they’re not in the clear yet. (Energy News Network)

RENEWABLES: Concord, New Hampshire’s city council unanimously passes a 100 percent renewable energy goal. (North American Windpower)

OIL AND GAS:
• The BLM delays plans to lease 18,000 acres near Colorado’s Great Sand Dunes National Park and agrees to meet with tribal leaders concerned about drilling near sacred lands. (Denver Post)
• The Trump administration threatens to undo a 2015 sage-grouse protection plan negotiated in a compromise between the oil and gas industry, conservation groups, and landowners in Wyoming. (Christian Science Monitor)
• A publicity shy Swiss billionaire has been quietly protecting thousands of acres of land in the West from oil and gas drilling. (Inside Philanthropy)

PIPELINES:
• Virginia regulators say Mountain Valley Pipeline developers’ failure to install and maintain erosion-control devices has harmed 8,800 feet of streams in six locations. (Roanoke Times)
• North Dakota’s attorney general sues the Dakota Access pipeline owner for allegedly violating a state law prohibiting large corporations from owning agricultural land. (Associated Press)
• Replacing the Line 3 pipeline in northern Minnesota still needs 29 more regulatory approvals before construction can start. (Minnesota Public Radio)

COAL: A decrease in air pollution from coal-fired power plants leads to a rebound of red spruce trees in the Northeast, a new study finds. (Associated Press)

UTILITIES:
• Exelon agrees to pay $140 million for FirstEnergy Solutions’ retail business, increasing its customer count by 40 percent. (Crain’s Chicago Business)
• A California court clears the state’s largest utility of liability from a 2015 wildfire, possibly establishing a legal precedent. (Utility Dive)

EFFICIENCY: Iowa utilities unveil new five-year energy efficiency plans that scale back home energy audits, insulation rebates and light bulb discounts. (Energy News Network)

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CLIMATE:
• California cities ask a Texas court to dismiss an oil company’s attempts to depose officials who brought a climate change lawsuit against the fossil fuel industry. (Forbes)
• During the first three years of California’s cap and trade program, the bulk of greenhouse gas reductions happened out-of-state, according to a new study. (Berkeley News)

COMMENTARY:
• It stands to reason Arizona’s largest utility would be behind a Koch brothers’ effort to fight a measure to prohibit “dark money” from political campaigns, says an Arizona columnist. (Arizona Republic)
• Two Louisville lawmakers say Kentucky regulators should prevent the gutting of energy efficiency programs proposed by a utility company. (Insider Louisville)

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