Western Energy News

Colorado co-ops to have more freedom to generate their own power

UTILITIES: In response to an exodus of member co-ops seeking to cut their own emissions, Colorado-based Tri-State Generation and Transmission will allow members to develop more of their own energy resources. (Denver Post)

ALSO:
A federal court vacates a FERC order holding that California utility PG&E could not back out of wholesale power contracts without the agency’s consent. (Reuters)
• Nevada regulators approve a $120 million NV Energy payout as a one-time credit on ratepayers’ October bills, double the previously announced amount. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

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PUBLIC LANDS:
A Bureau of Land Management spokesperson says the agency’s pandemic royalty relief program for oil companies was legal and has been done under other presidents. (Washington Post)
Sixty environmental organizations are calling for Bureau of Land Management decisions about Western public lands to be set aside in the wake of a federal ruling that William Perry Pendley led the agency unlawfully for 14 months. (Denver Post)

OIL & GAS: A California lawmaker says Gov. Gavin Newsom will have to make an effort to get the votes necessary to prohibit fracking beyond just giving his endorsement. (Los Angeles Times)

CALIFORNIA:
PG&E has added more than 300 weather stations and 137 fire watch cameras this year, increasing its situational awareness of fire-danger conditions. (Sierra Sun Times)
The CEO of a California demand-response startup says renters and lower- and moderate-income people are being overlooked in the state’s transition to clean energy. (Greentech Media)
A Central California city is developing a $70 million microgrid project to independently power its industrial park at cheaper rates than those offered by PG&E. (Monterey County Weekly)

SOLAR:
• A Wyoming city takes its “first major step toward carbon neutrality” with two solar panel installations. (Oil City News)
• The City and County of Denver announces a second solar co-op to help residents and small businesses take advantage of a community solar program. (news release)

WIND: An Oregon startup is betting big on wind farms even as federal tax credits are expected to be phased out. (Greentech Media)

TECHNOLOGY: California’s Energy Commission chooses vanadium batteries instead of lithium for a major storage project. (Power Technology)

COMMENTARY:
Two Colorado energy experts celebrate the state’s commitment to expanded, equitable energy efficiency. (National Resources Defence Council)
A Montana conservationist explains why Montana regulators should vote against NorthWestern Energy’s purchase of a greater share of a coal-fired power plant. (Montana Standard)

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