GAS: As Connecticut regulators consider modifying a program that helps customers transition from oil heating to natural gas, some advocacy groups say the ratepayer-subsidized program should end. (Energy News Network)

ALSO:
A New Jersey environmental official tells business leaders that Gov. Phil Murphy’s administration doesn’t answer calls for a fossil fuel moratorium “because that would have detrimental effects to everyone.” (WPG Talk Radio)
Federal regulators warn that New England may have trouble this winter securing natural gas amid a surge in export demand that is raising prices. (Utility Dive)

SOLAR:
A central Maine city ends a large-scale solar moratorium but will require developers to either hide the facilities from public view or make them more attractive. (Kennebec Journal)
State officials say installing a $1.5 million solar canopy at western Pennsylvania’s Presque Isle State Park will help the park save thousands of dollars annually and reach net-zero emissions. (Erie Times-News)

GRID:
Although the upcoming Maine transmission line referendum may end constant commercials supporting or opposing the project, legal experts say it won’t end the further legal action. (Bangor Daily News)
PJM Interconnection begins tallying the cost of bringing renewable energy onto its grid at the scale needed to allow five coastal states, including New Jersey, to reach their decarbonization goals. (NJ Spotlight)

UTILITIES: New Jersey and New York utility officials urge ratepayers to apply for state assistance before payment moratoria end. (CBS New York)

WORKFORCE:
As New Jersey bolsters its community solar energy program, some developers look to encourage high schoolers to enter the solar workforce. (NJ Spotlight)
A new $16 million renewable energy facility at a central New York college allows students to experience a variety of energy sources, including wind, hydro and solar. (Mid-York Weekly)

HYDROELECTRIC: The owner-operator of a small Rhode Island hydroelectric dam that hasn’t functioned since 2015 may surrender its license and cease operation, federal regulators decide. (Hydro Review)

WIND: Some lawmakers representing Massachusetts’ southern coast praise the governor’s recent offshore wind proposal, which includes removing a price cap currently imposed on the resource. (Boston University Statehouse Program)

COMMENTARY: A New Hampshire columnist outlines how a gas utility is arguing the state should allow it to retroactively change its tariff after failing to account for certain low-income policies, missing out on several million dollars worth of potential payments. (InDepth NH)