Daily digest

Dakota Access pipeline developer took lessons from Keystone XL rejection

PIPELINES:
• The developer behind the Dakota Access project says the failure of Keystone XL to gain federal approval impacted the company’s strategy. (The Gazette)
More Iowa landowners sue to block the Dakota Access project, claiming the company is not a public utility. (WHO-TV)

COGENERATION: The state of Michigan wants clean energy groups to take a close look at the untapped potential of combined heat and power (CHP) as a way to lower carbon emissions and increase efficiency. (Midwest Energy News)

***SPONSORED LINK: The Michigan Energy Fair announces two new partners: The Sustainable Living Summit 2016 and The Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo, June 24-25, Ingham County Fairgrounds, Mason, Michigan. For complete information go to www.glrea.org ***

POLICY:
• Michigan lawmakers advance sweeping energy reform bills that place restrictions on electric choice and phase out clean energy standards in favor of goals and more utility planning. (Midwest Energy News)
Referring to Michigan, solar advocates say eliminating net metering prevents states from having a thriving solar industry. (Michigan Radio)

PJM AUCTION:
• Consumers across PJM’s service territory will collectively pay $4 billion less for electricity in three years due to energy efficiency gains and a wave of new natural gas plants. (EnergyWire)
During the PJM auction, FirstEnergy was mum about the future of its struggling plants in Ohio. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
Chicagoans will pay more than twice as much for reliability as a result of the auction. (Crain’s Chicago Business)
• Exelon’s Quad-Cities nuclear plant failed to clear the auction, reinforcing the utility’s calls for support from the Illinois legislature. (Quad-City Times)

GRID: Xcel Energy seeks public input on the best ways to deliver more energy to the Twin Cities’ growing metro region. (KSTP)

RENEWABLES: Michigan State University is moving quickly to transition from coal while state officials are “still fussing with a stack of road maps.” (Lansing City Pulse)

SOLAR:
• The number of U.S. solar installations reaches the one million milestone, but there is still far to go to make an impact on limiting climate change. (InsideClimate News)
A Wisconsin concrete company sees new work with a major solar installation. (GazetteXtra)
A Minnesota nonprofit receives a $500,000 grant to fund a shared solar array in a tribal community. (Pineandlakes Echo Journal)

UTILITIES:
• Ohio regulators agree to hear AEP’s latest income guarantee request for struggling plants that is scaled back from its original proposal. (Columbus Business First)
An Indiana utility details plans for a $100 million water infrastructure project in the central part of the state. (Inside Indiana Business)

CLIMATE: A new study shows Canadian tar sands production is one of North America’s largest sources of secondary organic aerosols. (Climate Central)

REGULATION: A new chairman of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio is sworn in. (Columbus Dispatch)

WIND: The industry is facing a “valley of death” in the early 2020s as tax credits wind down and utilities meet initial Clean Power Plan targets. (Utility Dive)

OIL AND GAS:
• North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple says the state’s oil industry is “as solid as solid can be.” (Associated Press)
Canada’s central bank says the country’s economy will shrink due to the wildfires that shut down oil sands production. (Associated Press)
A North Dakota oil company will pay $250,000 to settle a federal racial discrimination lawsuit. (Associated Press)
• A Kansas man faces up to 20 years in prison after being indicted as part of a $7.9 million oil and gas scheme. (Associated Press)

CONGRESS: A key U.S. Senate leader who has been negotiating sweeping energy policy changes says the House is being difficult by adding partisan provisions to the deal. (E&E Daily)

COMMENTARY: A former Minnesota lawmaker says the Clean Power Plan is “putting our pro-business climate at risk.” (Osakis Review)

Comments are closed.