Daily digest

Upton, GOP vow to fight EPA’s climate authority

EPA: A federal appeals court Tuesday upheld the EPA’s “endangerment finding” for greenhouse gases, saying the agency is “unambiguously correct” in interpreting that the Clean Air Act requires the agency to regulate emissions that contribute to climate change. [View the full text of the ruling here.] (Reuters)

ALSO: Michigan Rep. Fred Upton attacked the ruling as “a devastating blow to the U.S. economy and American consumers,” renewing his push for a bill that would strip the EPA’s authority to regulate greenhouse gases. (The Hill)

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OIL: Part 2 of InsideClimate’s investigative report on the 2010 Kalamazoo River oil spill explores the differences between “dilbit” from the Canadian oil sands and conventional crude oil.

KEYSTONE XL: The Obama administration has granted construction permits for the southern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline, connecting Cushing, Oklahoma, to the Gulf Coast. (New York Times)

SOLAR: A new report says the solar production glut will persist for another three years, with panel prices falling by nearly half by 2015. (Reuters)

WASTE-TO-ENERGY: Cleveland’s effort to build an innovative new waste-to-energy plant has been dogged by controversy and (inaccurate) visions of burning garbage. (ClimateWire)

SURVEY SAYS: A new poll finds 80 percent of Ohioans believe developing advanced energy technology will be important to the state’s economic future. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

EFFICIENCY: Minnesota-based Andersen Windows says it has reduced its energy consumption by 22 percent, saving the company $3 million over the past five years. (St. Paul Pioneer Press)

TRANSPORTATION: Automotive reviewers rave about the Tesla Model S sedan, and is the Chevy Volt too affordable? (Treehugger, The Motley Fool)

COMMENTARY: Stephen Lacey says the utility and business interests seeking to defeat a ballot measure expanding Michigan’s renewable energy standard don’t have the facts on their side. (Climate Progress)

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