U.S. Energy News

DOE to fund development of floating offshore wind turbines

WIND:
The U.S. Department of Energy commits $28 million to develop advanced floating offshore wind turbines. (Greentech Media)
• An Iowa state senator who unexpectedly resigned this month takes a job lobbying for the American Wind Energy Association. (Associated Press)

SOLAR:
• Clean energy advocates say the Tennessee Valley Authority’s planned shift to solar energy lacks urgency and specifics. (Nashville Public Radio)
• Some Illinois farmers embrace solar development as a source of additional income. (Washington Post)

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CLIMATE:
• Exxon Mobil complains to U.S. financial regulators that an investor proposal calling for the company to set greenhouse gas emission targets is a misleading attempt to “micro-manage the company.” (Reuters)  
• At least eight U.S. cities, five counties and one state are suing some of the world’s largest fossil fuel companies for their role in climate change. (Vox)
• Republican Charlie Baker of Massachusetts may be one of the most aggressive governors in the country on addressing climate change. (E&E News)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Scientists are working to develop a liquid battery technology that could be refilled in minutes at a vast network of converted gas stations. (NBC News)

ETHANOL: The U.S. EPA agrees to finally conduct a long-delayed study to assess the impact of burning ethanol on air quality. (Reuters)

TRANSMISSION: Achieving high levels of renewable energy requires bolstering the U.S. transmission grid, a significant political challenge. (E&E News, subscription)

COAL:
• The redevelopment of two former coal plant sites is a significant factor in tomorrow’s Chicago City Council election. (Energy News Network)
• President Trump names the wife of a well-known coal executive to serve as the nation’s ambassador to the United Nations. (E&E News, subscription)

PIPELINES:
The Dakota Access pipeline developer sues Greenpeace in state court after a federal judge dismissed the company’s racketeering claims. (Associated Press)
• North Dakota officials say a highway shutdown during Dakota Access protests was not meant to manipulate the media or tribes. (Associated Press)

NATURAL GAS:
Plastics production follows the natural gas fracking boom to Appalachia, bringing with it health and environmental concerns. (InsideClimate News)
• Federal regulators approve plans for a liquified natural gas export terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, and a pipeline to supply the facility. (CNBC)

UTILITIES:
Advocates say Minnesota utilities are not disclosing avoided costs, which determine whether third-party generators can sell power to utilities. (Energy News Network)
A Memphis utility considers leaving the TVA, citing potential savings by generating its own power or purchasing it from other suppliers. (Times Free Press)

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POLITICS:
• The author of California’s landmark law requiring the state to get all of its electricity from renewables by 2045 is running for Los Angeles city council. (Greentech Media)
• Energy Secretary Rick Perry applauds an Arizona utility’s clean energy investment as he called for an “all of the above” approach to energy development. (Arizona Republic)

COMMENTARY:
How a pipeline controversy could turn New York Harbor into “the Standing Rock of 2019.” (Daily Beast)
• The president of the Conservative Energy Network says renewable energy isn’t the political wedge issue it once was. (The Hill)

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