Midwest Energy News

East Coast limitations spark Great Lakes offshore wind interest

CORRECTION: An item in yesterday’s newsletter should have said coal plants operated by regulated, vertically integrated utilities are less likely to be economically dispatched compared to merchant plants in grid operator MISO’s territory.

WIND: Companies remain interested in Great Lakes offshore wind development, driven in part by limited sites along the East Coast. (Greentech Media)

UTILITIES:
• Exelon is evaluating plans to separate its non-utility assets, including nuclear plants, from the business as power companies increasingly seek to unload unregulated assets. (Bloomberg)
• Xcel Energy is the only major investor-owned utility to tie executive compensation to decarbonization goals, according to a recent report that was also highly critical of a Michigan utility’s coal plant bonuses. (Utility Dive, Energy News Network archive)
• The Sierra Club opposes Madison Gas and Electric’s plan to freeze electricity rates next year, saying it locks in a regressive rate structure overly reliant on fixed charges. (Wisconsin State Journal)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Interstate 94 through southeastern Wisconsin now features “EV ready” signage notifying drivers of fast-charging stations available every 50 miles. (Wisconsin State Journal)

SOLAR:
• A central Indiana city adopts a renewable energy ordinance that creates a net metering program through the local utility. (Daily Journal)
• Solar advocates say Ameren’s move to close off its existing net metering program to new customers “creates tremendous instability and uncertainty” for the industry in central and southern Illinois. (WSIU)

TRANSPORTATION: More than 120 Minnesota candidates in this year’s election have signed a pledge opposing the state’s effort to adopt more stringent vehicle emission standards as critics look to make it a campaign issue. (MinnPost)

NUCLEAR: The uncertain future of a northern Illinois nuclear plant emerges as a key issue in a pair of legislative races. (Northern Public Radio)

COAL: Duke Energy’s new long-term clean energy targets include “working with stakeholders to accelerate (the) retirement of coal plants in Indiana.” (Utility Dive)

POLITICS: The power plant bailout scandal unfolding in Ohio has prompted questionable political attack ads involving candidates’ roles in the legislation. (Cleveland.com)

COMMENTARY: Clean energy advocates call on the Nebraska Public Power District to analyze early retirement dates for a coal plant south of Lincoln after plans for converting some units to hydrogen fell through. (Lincoln Journal Star)

Comments are closed.