Daily digest

Exelon appears to be main benefactor of New York nuclear subsidies

NUCLEAR: Chicago-based Exelon appears to be the main benefactor of roughly $500 million in subsidies approved for struggling nuclear plants in New York. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE:
• The director of Detroit’s health department discusses how the fossil fuel industry has negatively affected city residents and why top city officials are pushing back against the industry. (Midwest Energy News)
• Detroit-area activists want to hear more about environmental justice issues from presidential candidates. (WDET-FM)

***SPONSORED LINK: The Energy Storage Conference, August 30-31 at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, will discuss the past, present, and future of battery storage, with technological, regulatory, and marketplace perspectives. ***

COAL:
• An Indiana university will continue to invest millions in a program that trains students on mining safety. (Vincennes Sun-Commercial)
• The U.S. coal industry appears to have gone through a period of right-sizing. (SNL / Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis)

SOLAR:
• New solar cells being developed by researchers in Illinois turn carbon dioxide into fuel. (Christian Science Monitor)
• An Indiana town looks to build a solar project at its sewage treatment plant. (Northwest Indiana Times)

OIL AND GAS:
• Pipeline construction equipment valued at nearly $1 million was destroyed in central Iowa in “a shameful act” of suspected arson. (Des Moines Register)
• North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple outlines his plan to address a $310 million state budget shortfall caused in part by slumping oil prices. (Associated Press)
• A truck that rolled over in North Dakota spilled more than 5,000 gallons of an oil and saltwater mixture. (Associated Press)
• A North Dakota town drafts a new ordinance that would ban temporary housing units for oil workers inside city limits. (Williston Herald)

WIND: Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton says wind energy and transmission development will be key for rural Midwest states. (Radio Iowa)

TRANSPORTATION:
• Electric vehicle advocates say different formats for fast-charging units — and an unwillingness among automakers to have uniform standards — is hindering growth. (ClimateWire)
• The CEO of AEP in Ohio says he won’t buy a Tesla vehicle because of the company’s ties to SolarCity, which has opposed rolling back solar net metering. (Columbus Business First)

***SPONSORED LINK: Now Open: Midwest Energy News 40 Under 40 award program seeks young leaders working to transition Midwest to clean energy. Make your nomination today! ***

CYBERSECURITY: Regulators urge electric distribution companies to adopt new cybersecurity rules. (RTO Insider)

COMMENTARY: Thanks to an extension of federal tax credits, the U.S. wind industry has thrived through the first half of 2016. (Huffington Post)

Comments are closed.