Northeast Energy News

Exelon’s lobbying spending soars amid Pennsylvania nuclear debate

NUCLEAR: Exelon’s lobbying expenditures in Pennsylvania soared last year to nearly $1.8 million following its threat to close the Three Mile Island plant. (York Dispatch)

ALSO: Data from New York’s grid operator show that during an unplanned two-week shutdown of the Indian Point nuclear plant, nearly the entire gap in power production was filled by natural gas generation. (Lohud.com)

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WIND: As Maine’s anti-wind policies are reversed, it remains unclear how long the “chilling effect” on development will last. (Energy News Network)

SOLAR:
Maine Gov. Janet Mills signed a bill yesterday that restores net metering credits for solar generation. (Press Herald)
Officials in a Massachusetts town approve a solar project with the condition that a fence be built to protect a historic ash tree. (Patriot Ledger)

TRANSMISSION:
On the second day of a week-long hearing on a controversial power line in Maine, the public got to weigh in on the potential environmental impact of the project. (Bangor Daily News)
Some Maine lawmakers strongly oppose the project, with one calling it a “boondoggle of major proportions.” (VillageSoup)

PIPELINES:
• Massachusetts U.S. Reps. Seth Moulton and Lori Trahan told a congressional hearing that federal oversight of pipeline safety must improve in the wake of last year’s gas explosion. (Boston Herald)
• A homeowner whose residence is near construction of the Mariner East 2 pipeline says it feels like living in an earthquake zone. (County Press)

OIL AND GAS: A Pennsylvania township that lost its court fight against a driller’s wastewater well says a court order to pay $103,000 in attorneys’ fees to the winner will bankrupt the community. (Post Gazette)

UTILITIES:
• Three Maine legislators will hold a town hall meeting in Rockport on Thursday to discuss their proposal to replace the state’s two investor-owned utilities with a public authority. (Penobscot Bay Pilot)
• A Delaware utility is giving away free trees to help save energy and reduce pollution. (Delaware Public Media)

TRANSPORTATION: A new compressed natural gas station used to fuel motor vehicles is now open to the public. (Delaware State News)

***SPONSORED LINK: ACI’s 9th National Conference on Microgrids will bring together key industry players and feature an exclusive tour of the Otis Air National Guard Base Microgrid. Join us April 17-18 in Boston to discuss the latest developments and challenges of microgrid infrastructures.***

HYDRO:
A proposed new “fish-friendly” hydropower plant in Pennsylvania is awarded a $1.4 million state grant. (Morning Call)
A tidal energy system will be tested in New York City next year. (Hydro Review)

COMMENTARY:
• An environmental advocate in Maryland says an amendment to the state constitution is a viable tool in the fight against climate change. (Bay Journal)
• A nonprofit energy policy organization says New York should reverse its policy to automatically oppose every gas transmission pipeline. (Westfaironline)
A developer says Connecticut law must be changed to allow net metering for the solar industry to recover in the state. (CT Mirror)

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