Midwest Energy News

Fiat Chrysler expects $259M fine to settle emission cheating allegations

TRANSPORTATION: Fiat Chrysler expects to pay nearly $259 million to settle allegations involving cheating on diesel emissions tests. (Detroit News)

ALSO: Ford expects its new electric Transit van to be profitable by tapping into the commercial market. (E&E News, subscription)

***SPONSORED LINK: The New England Energy Summit, Nov. 16, 23 and 30 will bring together industry leaders, end users and policymakers to address emerging issues and engage in impactful discussion. Featuring keynote speakers Ernest J. Moniz and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse. Register at newenglandenergysummit.com .***

PIPELINES:
• The Keystone XL developer awards $1.6 billion in contracts to six U.S. firms to work on pipeline construction next year. (Pierre Capital Journal)
• Keystone XL supporters in Canada would have to convince a potential Biden administration of the project’s value in order to continue construction. (Politico) 

UTILITIES:
• Consumers Energy’s CEO says the utility could “work to adapt” to more aggressive emission targets if Joe Biden is elected. (Crain’s Detroit Business)
• Akron, Ohio, officials say the city’s future is closely tied to FirstEnergy’s ability to navigate the power plant bailout scandal. (Akron Beacon Journal)

RENEWABLES: Separate developers eye large-scale wind and solar projects totaling 575 MW of capacity in a western Michigan county. (Greenville Daily News)

SOLAR:
• County officials in southwestern Minnesota advance a solar ordinance that would help guide the development of large-scale projects. (The Globe)
• Ameren proposes a 6 MW solar project in eastern Missouri based on customer demand. (Jefferson City News Tribune)

POLITICS: Minnesota is among three states where Democratic gains in the state legislature could spur clean energy policy advancements. (E&E News, subscription)

WIND: South Dakota regulators approve the transfer of a wind project and transmission line but will require the new owner to fix roads that were damaged as part of construction. (KELO)

COMMENTARY:
• Hydrogen has potential for transportation, heating buildings and generating electricity, and “may prove to be key in humanity’s next energy transition,” an Ohio editorial board says. (Toledo Blade)
• Clean energy projects can help address the climate crisis, spur investment during the pandemic and reduce race and income disparities, a Minnesota solar developer says. (Star Tribune)

Comments are closed.