OHIO: Campaign finance reports show fossil fuel and utility companies are still contributing to Ohio lawmakers despite the state’s ongoing political bribery scandal. (Ohio Capital Journal)

ALSO:
• After years of state policy favoring fossil fuels at the expense of renewables, the long-term future of Ohio’s wind and solar is in doubt. (E&E News)
• Energy News Network reporter Kathiann Kowalski participates in a conversation on the future of renewable energy in Ohio. (WOSU)

UTILITIES:
• Michigan activists call for a federal bailout of utility customers to help people who have been unable to pay bills during the pandemic. (Energy News Network)
• A growing number of Illinois households pay more to buy power from retail electricity suppliers than they would from ComEd, raising questions about the effectiveness of recent reforms. (Crain’s Chicago Business)
ComEd argues that customers who claim they paid higher electricity bills after the utility bribed public officials can’t sue the utility. (Law360, subscription)

PIPELINES:
• Indigenous TikTokers say they were banned from the app after posting video of police violence against Line 3 protesters in northern Minnesota. (Daily Dot)
• An Ojibwe activist describes Line 3 protesters being shot with rubber bullets and denied medical care by Minnesota law enforcement. (Democracy Now) 

POWER PLANTS:
• Excelon says it still plans to retire uneconomic reactors at two Illinois nuclear plants this fall unless it receives a bailout from the state or federal government. (Reuters)
• Opponents of a proposed natural gas plant in Superior, Wisconsin, petition the federal government to deny funding for the project. (State Journal)

WIND:
• A developer seeks a rehearing for a proposed wind farm in northern Ohio, arguing state regulators denied the project’s application based on speculative concerns from local opponents. (Farm and Dairy)
• A developer says it is considering an appeal after Michigan environmental regulators denied a wetlands permit for its Scotia Wind project. (Mining Gazette)
• North Dakota regulators order a Minnesota utility to remove a wind turbine after a rancher argued it was too close to their farmhouse. (Grand Forks Herald)

SOLAR:
• A geology professor attempts to assure central Wisconsin residents that two proposed solar projects will not be harmful to public health. (WAOW)
• A Nebraska city council votes to move forward with a 2 MW solar project that officials say will help with economic development. (Wahoo Newspaper)
• A southern Ohio village council sends a letter of concern to Ohio regulators in advance of a meeting next week on a proposed solar farm. (Times Gazette)
• Ohio regulators will hold a local public hearing next month on a proposed 100 MW solar farm in Marion County, north of Columbus. (Farm and Dairy)

STORAGE: A long-duration energy storage company is trying to prove its model for an iron-air battery with a demonstration project in Minnesota, which has piqued curiosity from the state’s Iron Range. (Canary Media, Mesabi Tribune)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• A pilot project to install electric vehicle chargers on light poles in Kansas City aims to make charging more accessible to residents without garages. (Utility Dive)
A Minnesota electric truck startup plans to send its first five trucks to a California municipal utility near the end of 2021. (White Bear Press) 

COMMENTARY: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and President Joe Biden “are failing to protect our health” by allowing the Line 3 pipeline project despite disastrous downstream consequences, three medical doctors write. (Minnesota Reformer) 

Dan Haugen

Dan has two decades' experience working in print, digital and broadcast media. Prior to joining the Energy News Network as managing editor in December 2017, he oversaw watchdog reporting at the Sioux Falls Argus Leader, part of the USA Today Network, and before that spent several years as a freelance journalist covering energy, business and technology. Dan is a former Midwest Energy News journalism fellow and a member of Investigative Reporters and Editors. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and mass communications from University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.