U.S. Energy News

Fracking chemicals detected in Pennsylvania drinking water

FRACKING: An analysis of drinking water from three homes in Pennsylvania revealed traces of a chemical used in Marcellus Shale drilling fluids, according to a study published Monday. (The New York Times)

ALSO: Texas lawmakers sent a bill to the governor Monday that will ban cities in the state from prohibiting fracking and other potentially environmentally harmful oil and natural gas drilling activities. (The Dallas Morning News)

ARCTIC DRILLING: The Port of Seattle must apply for a new land-use permit in order to serve as a hub for Shell’s offshore Arctic oil-drilling fleet, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said Monday. (The Seattle Times)

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
The EPA’s proposed carbon limits for power plants could prevent 3,500 deaths per year, a new academic study says. (The Washington Post)
While the EPA recommends Minnesota meet carbon targets through efficiency and natural gas, renewable energy—particularly wind—may be a cheaper option. (Midwest Energy News)

CONSERVATION: The Supreme Court announced Monday that it will consider an Obama administration appeal to a lower court ruling that struck down a regulation meant to encourage energy conservation. (The Hill)

HYDRO: Colorado is embarking on a $3.4 million experiment backed by the federal government to tap the flood irrigation farmers use to grow crops to generate electricity. (The Denver Post)

EFFICIENCY: The U.S. Department of Energy has given out $8.2 million to advance research into energy-efficient lighting technologies such as LED, the agency announced Monday. (The Hill)

RENEWABLES MANDATES:
New Jersey’s Senate Environment and Energy Committee on Monday approved a bill that would require New Jersey gets at least 80 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2050. (NJ.com)
Kansas’ governor announced a deal Monday to make the state’s renewable portfolio standard optional rather than a mandate. (ThinkProgress)

SHALE OIL: Shares in U.S. shale-oil drillers fell after an influential money manager slammed the industry as wasteful, expensive and a terrible investment. (Bloomberg)

GAS PIPELINE: A group of Virginia Republicans and other landowners is protesting a proposed natural gas pipeline near their backyards and using tactics similar to the environmental crusade against the Keystone XL oil pipeline. (Politico)

INVESTMENT: The World Bank indirectly invests part of its $18.8 billion staff pension fund in companies such as Peabody Coal and ExxonMobil, holdings that clash with the development institution’s own calls for ethical and low-carbon investing. (Reuters)

BIOFUELS: U.S. government delays in renewable fuels policy have stymied some $13.7 billion in investments, according to an industry group analysis. (Reuters)

BATTERIES: SolarCity has begun taking orders for Tesla’s energy-storage systems, starting at $5,000 installed. (Bloomberg)

CONSUMPTION: The silent boxes that bend television schedules to your will, play video games and bring the Web into your living room are exacting a growing energy cost for the convenience. (ClimateWire)

 

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