Daily digest

Grid official says reliability would not be a problem if two Ohio nuclear plants close

GRID: Invenergy offers a look inside its control center in downtown Chicago, where the clean-energy company controls its fleet of wind turbines, natural gas generators and energy-storage systems across North America. (Midwest Energy News)

SOLAR: A company tells officials in an eastern Michigan county — known as the state’s “wind capital” — that it wants to develop as many as 15 20-acre solar projects there. (Huron Daily Tribune)

NUCLEAR:
• An official with grid operator PJM says there would not be a reliability problem if two Ohio nuclear plants are are forced to close without financial support. (Crain’s Cleveland Business)
• Dominion Energy employees successfully complete the transfer of used nuclear fuel into a dry fuel storage facility at a Wisconsin nuclear plant. (Electric Light & Power)

PIPELINES:
• A host of problems associated with the Rover natural gas pipeline could delay the project’s planned Nov. 1 completion. (Bloomberg)
• Roughly 200 people speak out in favor and against a proposed pipeline replacement and expansion in northern Minnesota. (Bemidji Pioneer)

WIND: President Trump’s criticism of wind energy during a speech this week in Iowa didn’t sit well in a state that has bipartisan support for the industry. (Associated Press)

RENEWABLES: The U.S. Conference of Mayors, who represent a 148 million people and 41.8 percent of the country’s electricity use, plans to vote this weekend on making 100 percent renewable energy targets a top policy priority over the next decade. (Huffington Post)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: An electric vehicle manufacturer plans to buy an assembly plant in northern Indiana and invest $30 million in upgrades. (Associated Press)

HYDRO: A U.S. House committee advances a bill that would give the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission authority over the licensing of all hydropower projects. (RTO Insider)

WASTE-TO-ENERGY: A firm is hired to determine what went wrong with a biodigester in mid-Michigan whose odor problems led to community backlash and the facility’s closing last year. (MLive)

CLEAN ENERGY: A grassroots group in Wisconsin launches a campaign to boost public support for clean energy and push utilities to take action. (Cleantechnica)

CLIMATE: After the Trump administration moved to rescind the Clean Power Plan and exit the Paris climate agreement, the CEO of Michigan-based DTE Energy says “it was my judgment that it was time to be more transparent, get out in front on this issue and show some leadership.” (MLive) 

OIL AND GAS: A trucking company that illegally dumped oilfield waste on a North Dakota road in 2014 continues to contest a $950,000 state fine, taking its case to the state Supreme Court. (Bismarck Tribune)

COMMENTARY:
• Utilities in Michigan and Minnesota are showing why it makes business sense to transition to more renewable energy. (Union of Concerned Scientists)
• Another Ohio editorial board advocates for easing wind turbine setback requirements in the state in order to attract new development. (Findlay Courier)

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