U.S. Energy News

House Republicans huddle on climate legislation

CLIMATE: The decade that just ended was by far the hottest ever measured on Earth, and scientists see no end in sight to human-caused warming. (Associated Press)

ALSO:
Congressional Republicans meet today to discuss the party’s climate legislation after Democrats unveiled their sweeping proposal last week. (The Hill)
A key Oregon Republican continues to oppose cap-and-trade legislation, saying he would prefer to see the policy referred to voters. (Oregon Live)

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GRID:
A new report says a lack of transmission imperils state renewable energy goals, with no obvious solution in sight. (Greentech Media)
A new transmission line moving wind energy from Iowa and Missouri may relieve grid congestion in one area but worsen it elsewhere. (Greentech Media)
Connecticut’s top energy official says the state may withdraw from the regional power grid, citing a “lack of leadership” on cutting emissions. (Hartford Courant)

SOLAR:
As U.S. trade representatives review President Trump’s tariffs, the solar industry is seeking changes it says will spur domestic manufacturing. (Greentech Media)
Solar company Silicon Ranch partners with a Georgia livestock farm to encourage regenerative agriculture practices on solar farms. (Solar Power World)

STORAGE: Florida Power & Light plans to install a mega-battery in a Miami neighborhood big enough to power 7,000 homes for four hours. (Miami Herald)

WIND: A developer will create an offshore wind innovation hub in Rhode Island focused on next-generation technologies for the growing industry. (Providence Journal)

CLEAN ENERGY: Four cities in Connecticut have passed resolutions urging the state to approve community choice aggregation, which would allow municipalities to procure clean energy on behalf of their residents. (Energy New Network)

UTILITIES: Colorado energy provider Tri-State Generation and Transmission plans to build eight new solar and wind projects by 2024 and cut greenhouse-gas emissions by 90% by 2030. (Durango Herald, Denver Post)

COAL:
A New Mexico coal plant will close a decade sooner than planned due to groundwater scarcity. (Utility Dive)
A three-day protest by Kentucky coal miners who blocked a railroad track over unpaid wages ends after the company pays all wages. (Lexington Herald-Leader)
A federal judge in West Virginia refuses to toss the conviction of former coal company CEO Don Blankenship for conspiring to violate mine safety laws. (Associated Press)

EFFICIENCY:
Two lighting industry organizations have withdrawn their lawsuit challenging California’s new efficiency standards for lightbulbs. (San Francisco Chronicle)
A new Minneapolis ordinance takes effect requiring an energy efficiency score on homes for sale. (Southwest Journal)

RENEWABLES: The acting head of Rhode Island’s energy office says the state can reach its goal of 100% renewable energy this decade largely with its pending project pipeline. (Providence Journal)

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OIL & GAS:
• Fracking has helped reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but it’s also prolonging the country’s dependence on fossil fuels, researchers and analysts say. (Vox)
Florida will buy 20,000 acres of privately owned wetlands to prevent oil drilling in the Everglades. (Reuters)

COMMENTARY:
A former U.S. Federal Highway Administration official says America’s renewable energy future is limited by antiquated bureaucracies and red tape. (Deseret News)
An environment and natural resources lawyer explains why he thinks the popular view among some environmental advocacy groups on the safest way to close ash ponds is wrong. (Utility Dive)

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