The Western Energy News digest will not be published tomorrow, June 18, for the Juneteenth holiday. We’ll be back on Monday.

CLEAN ENERGY: A giant new Las Vegas casino and the state’s largest utility ask regulators to approve a market-based deal aimed at powering the casino with all renewable energy. (Nevada Independent)

ALSO:  PacifiCorp proposes adding 1,641 megawatts of Wyoming wind power and 1,243 megawatts of Utah solar-plus-storage to its generation portfolio. (Portland Business Journal)

OIL & GAS:
Colorado regulators propose upping financial guarantees for oil and gas wells to ensure operators don’t leave cleanups to the state. (Colorado Sun)
A new report finds the methane mitigation industry has doubled in size since 2017 and that new New Mexico emissions rules could encourage even further growth. (Carlsbad Current-Argus)
New Mexico regulators fine an oil and gas company $204,300 for alleged violations connected to a natural gas facility fire. (Carlsbad Current-Argus)
Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon praises a judge’s ruling that put a hold on the Biden administration’s oil and gas leasing freeze. (Cheyenne Post)

LITHIUM: The CEO of a lithium mining company says its proposed Nevada project is on schedule, despite a court-ordered pause while an environmental lawsuit is considered. (AMM)

GEOTHERMAL: An Alaska Native corporation teams up with the City of Unalaska to develop a 30-megawatt geothermal plant at the base of a volcano. (Alaska Journal)

GRID:
The Nevada Public Utilities Commission urges Western utilities to form a regional grid to boost reliability. (Nevada Appeal)
Thousands lose power in southeastern New Mexico due to heat-related strains on El Paso Electric’s grid. (El Paso Matters)
California’s grid operator asks customers to conserve electricity today for the first time during June’s heat wave. (KGTV)

NUCLEAR: A Los Angeles judge rules against an advocacy group looking to halt the dismantling of the shuttered San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station over environmental safety concerns. (San Diego Union-Tribune)

UTILITIES:
A Southern California community power provider begins shutting down after going into bankruptcy. (Press Enterprise)
Hundreds of thousands of Oregonians risk losing power when a moratorium on cut-offs for delinquent payments ends on July 31. (Salem Reporter)

CLIMATE: Flagstaff, Arizona’s city council adopts a plan for reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2030, and Boise, Idaho, pledges to go carbon-neutral by 2050. (Arizona Daily Sun, Spokesman-Review)

WIND: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service accepts Avangrid’s condor conservation plan for its 189-megawatt Manzana wind farm in California. (Renewables Now)

SOLAR:
Hawaiian Electric hopes to make up for power shortages when a coal plant closes by subsidizing rooftop solar, storage, and demand response technology for customers. (RTO Insider, subscription)
Applications pour in for a newly created community solar program in New Mexico even though regulations for the program have yet to be developed. (Carlsbad Current-Argus)

COMMENTARY:
A California union leader and manufacturing industry advocate say the state’s electric vehicle push must support American workers by including domestic manufacturing requirements. (CalMatters)
A Wyoming editorial board welcomes a proposed “clean, safe, and dependable” advanced nuclear reactor to the state. (Cody Enterprise)

Jonathan P. Thompson

Jonathan hails from southwestern Colorado and has been writing about the land, cultures, and communities of the Western United States for more than two decades. He compiles the Western Energy News digest. He is the author of three books, a contributing editor at High Country News, and the editor of the Land Desk, an e-newsletter that provides coverage and context on issues critical to the West.