The Western Energy News digest will not be published tomorrow, June 18, for the Juneteenth holiday. We’ll be back on Monday.

CLEAN ENERGY: A giant new Las Vegas casino and the state’s largest utility ask regulators to approve a market-based deal aimed at powering the casino with all renewable energy. (Nevada Independent)

ALSO:  PacifiCorp proposes adding 1,641 megawatts of Wyoming wind power and 1,243 megawatts of Utah solar-plus-storage to its generation portfolio. (Portland Business Journal)

OIL & GAS:
Colorado regulators propose upping financial guarantees for oil and gas wells to ensure operators don’t leave cleanups to the state. (Colorado Sun)
A new report finds the methane mitigation industry has doubled in size since 2017 and that new New Mexico emissions rules could encourage even further growth. (Carlsbad Current-Argus)
New Mexico regulators fine an oil and gas company $204,300 for alleged violations connected to a natural gas facility fire. (Carlsbad Current-Argus)
Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon praises a judge’s ruling that put a hold on the Biden administration’s oil and gas leasing freeze. (Cheyenne Post)

LITHIUM: The CEO of a lithium mining company says its proposed Nevada project is on schedule, despite a court-ordered pause while an environmental lawsuit is considered. (AMM)

GEOTHERMAL: An Alaska Native corporation teams up with the City of Unalaska to develop a 30-megawatt geothermal plant at the base of a volcano. (Alaska Journal)

GRID:
The Nevada Public Utilities Commission urges Western utilities to form a regional grid to boost reliability. (Nevada Appeal)
Thousands lose power in southeastern New Mexico due to heat-related strains on El Paso Electric’s grid. (El Paso Matters)
California’s grid operator asks customers to conserve electricity today for the first time during June’s heat wave. (KGTV)

NUCLEAR: A Los Angeles judge rules against an advocacy group looking to halt the dismantling of the shuttered San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station over environmental safety concerns. (San Diego Union-Tribune)

UTILITIES:
A Southern California community power provider begins shutting down after going into bankruptcy. (Press Enterprise)
Hundreds of thousands of Oregonians risk losing power when a moratorium on cut-offs for delinquent payments ends on July 31. (Salem Reporter)

CLIMATE: Flagstaff, Arizona’s city council adopts a plan for reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2030, and Boise, Idaho, pledges to go carbon-neutral by 2050. (Arizona Daily Sun, Spokesman-Review)

WIND: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service accepts Avangrid’s condor conservation plan for its 189-megawatt Manzana wind farm in California. (Renewables Now)

SOLAR:
Hawaiian Electric hopes to make up for power shortages when a coal plant closes by subsidizing rooftop solar, storage, and demand response technology for customers. (RTO Insider, subscription)
Applications pour in for a newly created community solar program in New Mexico even though regulations for the program have yet to be developed. (Carlsbad Current-Argus)

COMMENTARY:
A California union leader and manufacturing industry advocate say the state’s electric vehicle push must support American workers by including domestic manufacturing requirements. (CalMatters)
A Wyoming editorial board welcomes a proposed “clean, safe, and dependable” advanced nuclear reactor to the state. (Cody Enterprise)