U.S. Energy News

IEA: World on track for largest drop in emissions ever recorded

EMISSIONS: Global greenhouse gas emissions are on track to plunge nearly 8% this year, the largest drop ever recorded, though experts cautioned that the drop should not be seen as good news for climate change efforts. (New York Times)

NATURAL GAS: A UCLA study finds that levels of nitrogen dioxide inside California homes exceeded both state and national ambient air-quality standards after an hour of gas appliance use. (Grist)

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RENEWABLE ENERGY:
A California energy policy expert says the success of renewable energy combined with people’s experience of cleaner air during the coronavirus pandemic could encourage support for a “Green Stimulus” to rebuild the economy. (Science Magazine)
Colorado utility Xcel Energy finds that its least-cost mix of generation resources prioritized renewable energy bids instead of natural gas when using all-source procurement. (PV Magazine)
• Indiana utility NIPSCO says bids for wind and solar have come in “significantly less expensive than new gas-fired generation.” (PV Magazine)

OFFSHORE WIND: Orsted says its South Fork offshore wind project off Long Island will likely be delayed past its 2022 opening due to a prolonged federal review and COVID-19, and its other projects face similar risks. (Newsday, Greentech Media) 

SOLAR: As California homeowners seek to install solar and storage to make their homes more resilient to outages, they’re facing permitting delays and a lack of support from utility PG&E. (Los Angeles Times)

OIL & GAS:
• The Trump administration is expected to announce a plan as soon as today to offer oil companies loans possibly in exchange for a financial stake. (Bloomberg)
North Dakota regulators will hear testimony next month on whether oil production at current low prices amounts to wasting natural resources, potentially setting the stage for output restrictions. (S&P Global)
• Oklahoma-based shale gas company Chesapeake Energy is preparing a potential bankruptcy filing as it grapples with falling energy prices. (Reuters) 

PIPELINES: In a lawsuit over the Keystone XL pipeline, tribes warn that construction crews are flouting the developer’s COVID-19 social distancing guidelines. (E&E News, subscription)

TRANSMISSION:
A Missouri bill that would essentially block developers from using eminent domain for the Grain Belt Express wind energy transmission project advances for a full state House vote. (Energy News Network)
The Maine city that would serve as the hub for a power line to import Canadian hydropower would earn $7 million annually in tax revenues. (Sun Journal)

UTILITIES: A former Tennessee Valley Authority chairman joins an environmental group in criticizing the utility for spending money on an advertising campaign during the pandemic. (Chattanooga Times Free Press)

NUCLEAR: The Indian Point Unit 2 nuclear plant in New York shuts down for good tonight. (Associated Press)

CLEAN ENERGY:
• Germany’s 20-year clean energy transition that has included missteps along the way can provide critical lessons for the U.S. (InsideClimate News)
• A Vermont organization that promotes energy education moves its program online during the coronavirus pandemic. (Energy News Network)

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ELECTRIC VEHICLES: General Motors delays the unveiling of its new Hummer electric pick-up truck due to the pandemic. (CNET)

COMMENTARY: With state and local budgets in crisis, the time for a carbon tax is now, writes an energy sector lawyer and climate activist. (Climate Law Blog) 

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