U.S. Energy News

In largely symbolic gesture, Senate votes to strike down climate rules

EPA: The EPA proposes tougher limits on emissions in states that impact their downwind neighbors, and may exempt Florida and South Carolina from the rule. (Associated Press) 

POLITICS:
• In a largely symbolic gesture, the Senate votes to strike down President Obama’s two most far-reaching emission reduction rules. (New York Times)
• Advocates file two more ballot initiatives to advance clean energy policy in Oregon. (Portland Business Journal)

CLIMATE: 
• The Bureau of Land Management postpones an auction of oil and gas leases on federal land in Utah because of a high level of interest from climate advocates. (Deseret News)
• A new report outlines areas of the U.S. where the grid is most at risk from climate change. (Utility Dive)

COAL: A new report finds it “increasingly likely” that global coal consumption peaked in 2013. (InsideClimate News)

SOLAR:
• The White House announces an initiative to promote community solar. (USA Today)
• Amid industry criticism, the Massachusetts House advances a bill cutting the rate solar customers are paid for excess electricity. (MassLive)
• Advocates criticize Berkshire Hathaway for backing policies they say hinder solar development. (Omaha World-Herald)

WIND:
• Developers of a transmission line aimed at moving wind power from western Iowa to Illinois and points east have hit a stalemate with opposed landowners. (Midwest Energy News)
North Dakota regulators will likely approve a new 100-megawatt wind project there, but federal officials want a deeper study on potential impacts on bald eagles. (Associated Press)
A Vermont town votes to reject a proposed wind farm. (Vermont Public Radio)

UTILITIES:
After receiving permission for an 83 percent fixed-fee increase on customers last year, a Wisconsin utility is back for more. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• Why the grid of the future will depend on “distributed decision-making.” (Greentech Media)
• Experts say time-of-use rates and crediting distributed solar customers at wholesale rather than retail rates can send important price signals to prevent peak demand spikes. (Utility Dive)

TECHNOLOGY: The future of the auto industry is taking shape in California. (Los Angeles Times)

COMMENTARY:
• Advocates debunk another study claiming high costs from the Clean Power Plan. (The Equation)
• Why political fighting over the “war on coal” actually does a disservice to the coal industry. (New York Times)

 

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