Southeast Energy News

Kentucky coal miners may get paid after months of protests

COAL: As more natural gas and renewable power comes online, coal plants are running less, but utilities are still reluctant to shut them down. (E&E News)

ALSO: Lawyers for bankrupt coal company Blackjewel are offered a deal that would provide $5.5 million to pay former Kentucky employees. (Lexington Herald Leader)

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COAL ASH: Environmental groups say they plan to sue the EPA if the agency finalizes proposed changes that weaken coal ash regulations. (Bloomberg)

OIL & GAS:
• Methane sensors will be put on planes, trucks and towers in the Permian Basin to measure the oil and gas industry’s greenhouse gas emissions for a year, and the data will be made public. (Associated Press)
• West Virginia hosts an oil and gas expo where natural gas companies share their latest technology. (WV News)

SOLAR:
• “So what if I don’t want it in my backyard”: citizen groups that oppose solar projects are successfully stopping installations in Virginia and elsewhere. (E&E News, subscription)
• Sun Tribe Solar expands into the utility-scale solar business to help Virginia meet its renewable energy goals. (Greentech Media)
• A group of North Carolina solar developers sue Duke Energy, saying the utility has been delaying interconnections. (Triangle Business Journal, subscription)

WIND:
• A Dallas wind developer agrees to sell a 360 MW wind project. (Dallas Business Journal, subscription)
• A Canadian transmission line operator considers selling its stake in a Texas transmission company for $400 million to $500 million. (Bloomberg)

COMMENTARY:
• Senator Mitch McConnell says he’s committed to helping Kentucky coal miners and their families. (Courier Journal)
• South Carolina’s booming outdoor recreation industry is another reason to prevent offshore oil and gas drilling in the Atlantic, an editorial board says. (Post and Courier)
• Fracking technology in Texas has allowed gas producers to ramp up production and power a world where fossil fuels are still necessary, an editorial board says. (Dallas Morning News)

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