Northeast Energy News

Maine utility blames engineers for solar controversy

SOLAR: Central Maine Power blames mid-level engineers for sending much higher cost estimates to solar developers without proper review by senior management. (Portland Press Herald)

ALSO: Maine regulators will conduct three investigations into the ability of the grid to accommodate a large influx of solar power that led to the controversy. (Bangor Daily News)

CLIMATE: The Massachusetts undersecretary for climate policy resigns after comments he made at a conference about how residents would need to change their behavior to reduce emissions. (WBUR)

EFFICIENCY: Massachusetts legislators introduce a bill to retrofit nearly 1 million homes to be more energy efficient over the next decade. (RTO Insider, subscription required)

EQUITY: Advocates say third-party suppliers are compounding energy burdens for low-income households in Maryland. (Inside Climate News)

RENEWABLE ENERGY: New York City Council passes a law to conduct a feasibility study to convert the Rikers Island prison complex into a renewable energy hub. (New York Daily News)

GRID: The capacity auction for 2024-25 grid in New England held this week includes 630 MW of battery storage for the first time. (Concord Monitor, Greentech Media)

UTILITIES: New Jersey utility customers see no big hikes in bills as the state completes its 20th annual power supply auction. (NJ Spotlight)

OFFSHORE WIND: The nomination of Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo as U.S. Commerce Secretary rekindles a 2019 dispute with the state’s fishing industry over compensation related to the proposed Vineyard Wind offshore wind project. (E&E News, subscription required)

TRANSMISSION: New York regulators approve a 53-mile transmission line to bring renewable energy from upstate closer to New York City. (Albany Times Union)

PIPELINES: A federal court will hear arguments today in a lawsuit filed by opponents of a Massachusetts compressor station. (WBUR)

NATURAL GAS: County officials in New Jersey oppose the construction of a natural gas compressor which it says goes against the state’s emissions reduction goals. (news release)

COMMENTARY: Efficiency advocates say the Massachusetts climate law should be embraced by the building and construction industries as the standards it codifies have been successful in lowering costs elsewhere. (CommonWealth Magazine)

 

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