Midwest Energy News

Missouri court upholds Grain Belt Express transmission project

TRANSMISSION: The Missouri Court of Appeals upholds state regulators’ approval of the Grain Belt Express transmission project. (Associated Press)

SOLAR:
Minnesota recently became the first state to adopt new interconnection standards that solar installers say will make it easier to connect projects to the grid. (Energy News Network)
• A new solar project on top of a bus garage is a “triple win,” says the mayor of Madison, Wisconsin. (Madison Capital Journal)

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POLICY:
• Renewable energy groups are dismayed by a U.S. spending bill that passed the House Tuesday that does not extend solar tax credits and extends wind credits for just a year. (Reuters)
• The spending bill also does not extend a $7,500 tax credit for electric vehicles that General Motors and Tesla had sought. (Reuters)
• The year-end tax deal struck this week in Congress would benefit rural electric cooperatives and maintain a fee paid on coal production to cover health care costs for miners. (E&E News, subscription)

CLEAN ENERGY:
• It remains unclear whether a federal investigation into ComEd’s lobbying activity will stall progress on ambitious clean energy legislation. (Utility Dive)
• An Indiana energy task force seeks to set guidelines for future renewable energy development in the state. (Logansport Pharos Tribune)

PIPELINES:
• North Dakota officials are working to determine a fine for the operator of the Keystone Pipeline following a spill in late October. (Forum News Service)
• South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem proposes revisions to a state “riot-boosting” law that critics say specifically targets pipeline protests. (Associated Press)

EQUITY: Researchers find time-of-use rates that charge more for electricity during peak times can disproportionately harm vulnerable groups. (Scientific American)

WIND: A Nebraska county considers suspending new wind energy permits as new siting regulations are reviewed. (Beatrice Daily Sun)

COAL:
• As his company moved toward bankruptcy, former Murray Energy CEO Robert Murray earmarked nearly $1 million to fund efforts to cast doubt on climate change. (New York Times)
• Local officials in Springfield, Illinois, vote to extend the city utility’s contract for coal power through 2025. (Springfield State Journal-Register)

OIL & GAS:
• North Dakota regulators approve a plan to speed up investments in natural gas transportation and processing in hopes of reducing wasteful flaring. (Bismarck Tribune)
• County officials in southwestern Michigan adopt a policy that clarifies a ban on oil and gas development on parkland. (MLive)

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ELECTRIC VEHICLES: A global partnership between suppliers and automakers, including Ford and Fiat Chrysler, seeks to bring transparency to the origins of the raw materials used in electric vehicles. (Detroit News)

WASTE-TO-ENERGY: Iowa’s only waste-to-energy power plant receives upgrades to prevent wear from changes in the waste stream. (Radio Iowa)

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