U.S. Energy News

Nebraska court approves Keystone XL pipeline path

PIPELINES: In a long-awaited decision, the Nebraska Supreme Court upholds the route of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. (Omaha World-Herald)

CLIMATE:
• David Koch, the billionaire conservative activist who with his brother played a major role in funding climate-change denial groups, dies at 79. (NBC News)
• The Democratic National Committee formally rejects a proposal to hold a presidential primary debate focused on climate change. (NPR)

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COAL:
While touring Wyoming, a top Energy Department official says carbon capture can still save the coal industry, and that the administration will continue to pursue export markets. (Casper Star-Tribune, Wyoming Tribune Eagle)
• Moody’s Investors Services downgrades the North American coal sector to a “negative” outlook, citing expected earnings declines. (Utility Dive)
• A government audit reveals mines that changed ownership had worse safety records than those with the same owner. (Ohio Valley Resource)
• Several large coal plants set to operate for decades raise questions about utilities’ ability to achieve deep emission reductions. (E&E News, subscription)

BIOFUELS:
President Trump summons Cabinet members to brainstorm ways to address mounting anger from Farm Belt states over his administration’s policies that let oil refineries use less corn-based ethanol. (Reuters)
• The owner of an Indiana ethanol plant says it will shut down in October due to the Trump administration’s biofuel waivers for oil refiners. (Associated Press)
A biofuels producer proposes to buy part of a Philadelphia refinery closed by a June explosion that is slated for permanent shutdown. (Reuters)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Demand charges are hurting the economics of high voltage EV charging stations, almost all of which lose money, according to a new report. (Utility Dive)
• The plug-in hybrid car may be falling out of favor as automakers focus on all-electric vehicles. (E&E News, subscription) 

SOLAR: Widespread deployment of rooftop solar in a 5.4-square-mile section of Cleveland could produce enough electricity to power approximately 10,000 homes, according to a NASA analysis. (Energy News Network)

OIL & GAS: Oil and gas interests push back on legislation that would help protect an endangered lizard’s habitat from development. (Austin American-Statesman)

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UTILITIES:
• A judge won’t approve FirstEnergy Solutions’ bankruptcy reorganization until the company reaches an agreement with labor unions over worker contracts. (Utility Dive)
• Tennessee Valley Authority’s board approves measures that could add up to 14 GW of solar and 5 GW of storage over two decades. (E&E News, subscription)
• Duke Energy will roll out a new program in October that lets large customers buy solar or wind energy from independent power producers. (BPR)

COMMENTARY: Electrifying trucks and buses will expand options for consumers who want access to electric vehicles, advocates say. (Natural Resources Defense Council)

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