Western Energy News

Nevada companies won’t evade new clean energy targets, lawmakers say

POLITICS:
• Nevada lawmakers considering raising renewable energy standards want to find a way to make companies that have left the state’s largest electric utility meet any new targets. (Nevada Independent)
• Backed by environmental activists, Colorado Democrats are eyeing more regulations for greenhouse gas emissions, but the state’s oil and gas industry remains a powerful foe. (Colorado Sun)

CALIFORNIA FIRES
• California’s attorney general says the state’s largest utility could face murder or manslaughter charges if investigators determine their equipment caused recent deadly wildfires. (CNN)
• Officials with California’s largest electric utility say they are “open to a range of solutions” being discussed by state regulators, including splitting it into separate companies to help ensure its operations are as safe as possible. (Utility Dive)

NUCLEAR: A Washington-based nuclear venture chaired by Bill Gates has abandoned plans to build an experimental reactor in China as a result of new U.S. rules. (Reuters)

SOLAR:
• Analysts predict 2019 will be another strong year for an Arizona company that makes thin-film solar panels. (Forbes)
• Officials in an Oregon county will soon consider a request by California company to build a 10 MW solar farm. (The Herald and News)

REGULATION: A new report shows that the EPA office that serves several Western states opened 53 percent fewer enforcement cases against polluters in 2018 than in 2017. (High Country News)

OIL AND GAS:
• Alaska gas line corporation officials are asking for more time to finalize a deal with three Chinese partners for a $43 billion liquefied natural gas project. (Anchorage Daily News)
• Colorado likely won’t experience a propane shortage as a result of a recent emergency measure put into place that is already boosting supplies, according to a state trade association. (Denver Post)

COAL:
• An Oregon utility has asked California regulators for permission to charge local customers for upgrades being made to its coal plants in Colorado and Wyoming. (Los Angeles Times)
• One of Wyoming’s largest coal producers is at risk of being delisted by the New York Stock Exchange. (Casper Star Tribune)
• A bankrupt Colorado coal company has amassed more than $5 million in claims in Montana. (Billings Gazette)

COMMENTARY:
• A contributing editor to High Country News says a recent climate change editorial by Sen. John Barrasso of Wyoming is an example of “the sophistry we have come to expect from the petrocracy.”
• For a Green New Deal to work, the U.S. must end subsidies to fossil fuel industries, says an economist from Colorado State University. (Nature)

 

Comments are closed.