Northeast Energy News

New England grid operator sees ‘dramatic shift’ to clean energy

GRID: The regional grid operator in New England says that 95% of its interconnection queue is occupied by wind, solar and energy storage projects, compared to mostly natural gas projects five years ago. (Utility Dive)

SOLAR:
Critics say New England’s rapid embrace of solar energy is causing erosion and other environmental degradation as the states begin to impose stricter land-use regulations. (Bloomberg)
The developer of a solar project rejected by a Connecticut siting board two years ago resubmits a modified and scaled-back plan. (WSHU)
Two community solar farms serving 800 members in New York’s Hudson Valley are commissioned. (Solar Power World)

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CLIMATE:
Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey releases a white paper endorsing a price on carbon, echoing a similar call from the region’s grid operator. (CommonWealth Magazine)
Town meetings throughout New Hampshire today will feature resolutions to support a carbon fee promoted by youth climate activists. (NHPR)

OIL & GAS:
Columbia Gas pleads guilty in federal court to charges stemming from a fatal explosion in 2018 in a previously announced settlement that includes a $53 million fine. (Eagle-Tribune)
• National Grid holds the first of six public sessions on Long Island to outline customer alternatives to natural gas as part of a state-ordered settlement of its failed attempt to impose a moratorium on new hookups. (Newsday)
• Anti-gas activists release a report that challenge’s National Grid’s assertion that there is a natural gas shortage in metropolitan New York City that requires new pipelines. (City Limits)
• Dozens of organizations hold a rally at Pennsylvania’s capitol against proposed tax breaks for petrochemical manufacturers using fracked natural gas. (Ellwood City Ledger)

TRANSPORTATION: A publicly owned waste-to-energy company in Maine will convert to electric trucks powered by its burning of household trash by the end of the year. (Portland Press Herald) 

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TRANSMISSION: Despite efforts to stop a Central Maine Power transmission line from Canada, the company has spent tens of millions on land acquisition, engineering and other activities related to the project. (Portland Press Herald)

COMMENTARY: A former utility regulatory attorney says some of the greatest emissions reductions can come from advanced coal and natural gas technologies under development. (Pennsylvania Capital-Star)

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