GRID: Climate change has intensified record heat across the Northwest, with temperatures forcing utilities to institute rolling blackouts in a preview of future climate-induced threats to the grid. (Bloomberg, Washington Post)

ALSO: Congressional Democrats push for a revamp of transmission policy to clear the way for 100% clean energy goals and to fix grid problems like those seen during Texas’ February storm. (E&E News, subscription)

PIPELINES:
The U.S. Supreme Court decides the company behind the PennEast pipeline project can seize New Jersey’s state-owned lands, leaving environmental advocates worried about how the decision will affect other pipeline projects. (StateImpact Pennsylvania)
• The developer of the now-canceled Keystone XL pipeline can retain easements it secured for the project, causing uncertainty for landowners who lost land through eminent domain. (Inside Climate News)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• General Motors announces a $25 million fund that will focus on closing equity gaps as the company transitions to electric vehicles. (Detroit News)
• The U.S. Department of Energy’s attempt to eliminate cobalt and nickel from electric vehicle batteries due to human rights complaints will prove challenging, as it’s hard to make energy dense batteries without those components. (Grist)

OFFSHORE WIND: Advocates say the thousands of new jobs and billions of dollars fueling the burgeoning offshore wind industry in Massachusetts should be used to close the racial wealth gap. (Boston Globe)

CLIMATE: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce consistently downplayed the threat of climate change from 1989 to 2009, characterizing emissions reductions as “harmful to the American economy” during a pivotal time for the development of climate policy, a report finds. (Inside Climate News)

EMISSIONS:
• The EPA may have underestimated the oil and gas industry’s methane emissions by as much as 76% from 2017 to 2019, a study suggests. (The Hill)
• Texas regulators argue they don’t need to make any changes to meet federal rules requiring them to manage emissions that affect how hazy it is at national parks and wilderness areas. (Houston Chronicle)

NATURAL GAS: Several liquefied natural gas firms consider seeking certification of their gas as “responsibly produced” with lower carbon emissions in hopes customers will pay more for it. (Reuters)

BIOFUELS: U.S. Farm Belt lawmakers are expected to introduce legislation to boost public investment in biofuels as the industry combats the Biden administration’s push for electric vehicles. (Reuters)

POLITICS:
• Three Northwest congressmembers joined the U.S. House’s new Conservative Climate Caucus last week but have been relatively silent on how climate change has contributed to record heat waves in the region. (Politico)
• Most of the Conservative Climate Caucus members also rejected a measure to reverse a Trump administration rule limiting methane emissions regulations imposed on the oil and gas industry. (E&E News, subscription)
• A Louisiana congress member is named to lead a Republican energy, climate and conservation task force to develop policy goals ahead of the 2022 midterms. (E&E News, subscription)

SOLAR: A University of Connecticut research team builds a solar tree that visitors will be able to use to charge devices and learn more about the renewable energy source. (Energy News Network)

COMMENTARY: Two climate advocates say heat waves in the Northwest and California emphasize the need to incentivize electric heat pumps that can cool and heat. (Canary Media)