Midwest Energy News

Ohio AG wants utilities to show whether nuclear plants are profitable

NUCLEAR: Ohio’s attorney general says state lawmakers should require FirstEnergy and Energy Harbor officials to testify on whether two nuclear plants set to receive a $1.3 billion bailout are profitable without the subsidy. (Cleveland.com)

ALSO:
• An Ohio House committee reviewing the state’s power plant subsidy law adjourns for the coming weeks with no immediate plans for repeal. (Associated Press)
Nuclear companies in at least four states have followed a similar pattern: announce plant closures, negotiate with states over job losses and clean power, secure subsidies, and rescind closures. (Forbes)
• A renewable developer says Ohio’s nuclear subsidy debate created a “false dichotomy — that Ohio must sacrifice a clean-energy future at the expense of its energy past.” (Toledo Blade)

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CLEAN ENERGY: Indiana NAACP organizers create a clean energy job training program to develop a “black to green” pipeline in marginalized communities. (Energy News Network)

UTILITIES: FirstEnergy stands to receive hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue over the coming decade based on a decoupling provision in a state law at the center of a bribery scandal. (E&E News, subscription)

SOLAR: General Motors signs a power purchase agreement for a 180 MW solar project to be built in Arkansas. (PV Magazine)

COAL:
• Vistra Energy officials blame state subsidies, declining gas prices, overbuilt generation and grid operator MISO’s “irreparably dysfunctional” market while announcing a suite of coal plant closures in Ohio and Illinois. (Utility Dive)
• Former Murray Energy CEO Robert Murray files an application for black lung benefits despite years of fighting federal mining safety regulations aimed at curbing the disease. (Ohio Valley Resource)
• Missouri-based Arch Resources is considering divesting from thermal coal used in power plants and focusing on metallurgical coal used in steelmaking after a judge’s ruling blocked a joint venture with Peabody Energy. (E&E News, subscription)

OIL & GAS: An estimated 42,000 gallons of produced water leaks from a pipeline in western North Dakota. (Forum News Service)

TRANSMISSION: NextEra will pay $660 million to buy independent transmission company GridLiance, which owns 700 miles of high-voltage transmission lines in Kansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Nevada and Oklahoma. (RTO Insider, subscription)

COMMENTARY: Ameren Missouri’s revised long-term energy plan that significantly boosts renewable energy investments and retires coal plants earlier is a “big step in the right direction,” clean energy advocates say. (Natural Resources Defense Council)

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