OHIO: Democratic lawmakers push for a swift repeal of Ohio’s power plant bailout law, while Republican leaders say they want to avoid being “hasty and reckless.” (WOSU)

ALSO: State Rep. Larry Householder returns to the state House chamber for the first time since being charged with overseeing a bribery scandal involving the power plant bailout law, saying he will plead not guilty and that the law is “good legislation.” (Cleveland.com)

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SOLAR:
• Consumers Energy says advocates seeking higher compensation for Michigan customers who send excess solar power back to the grid are after a “sweetheart deal.” (MLive)
• DTE Energy seeks to build 420 MW of new solar capacity in the next two years to support demand for its voluntary renewable energy program. (MiBiz)
• County officials in northeastern Ohio sign a letter of intent to consider offsetting future power use with solar contracts. (Ashtabula Star Beacon)
• Solar projects by far dominate planned renewable energy projects in southern Ohio, according to state energy officials. (Highland County Press)

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: The COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating environmental injustice in Michigan, including through higher utility bills and fossil fuels pollution, according to a new study. (WKAR)

UTILITIES: An analysis shows it would cost Chicago $8.8 billion to cut ties with ComEd and municipalize its electricity system. (Utility Dive)

CLIMATE: Most Indiana Republicans support climate change resilience policies, though a wide gap remains between Democrats and Republicans who say climate change is happening, according to an Indiana University survey. (Indianapolis Star)

RENEWABLES: Developers and local and utility officials see strong potential for solar, wind and battery storage across Nebraska. (Omaha World-Herald)

OIL & GAS: Michigan officials host a public hearing today on a proposed consent order to resolve air quality violations at a Detroit oil refinery. (Associated Press)

CARBON CAPTURE: North Dakota utility officials discuss challenges with financing carbon capture projects during a visit by U.S. Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette. (Bismarck Tribune)

PIPELINES: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recommends the Justice Department negotiate a settlement with the state of North Dakota over policing costs related to Dakota Access pipeline protests. (Associated Press)

WIND: Developers eye southwestern Iowa for wind projects in the coming years after local officials adopted regulations this summer. (Hamburg Reporter)

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BIOFUELS: Former U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says current Secretary Sonny Perdue should visit Iowa farmers to hear firsthand about the biofuel industry’s challenges. (Radio Iowa)

COMMENTARY: An environmental attorney says Ohio’s power plant bailout law should be replaced with policy that supports clean energy and benefits consumers. (Cleveland.com)

Andy Balaskovitz

Andy Balaskovitz

Andy has been a journalism fellow for Midwest Energy News since 2014, following four years at City Pulse, Lansing’s alt-weekly newspaper. He covers the state of Michigan and also compiles the Midwest Energy News daily email digest. Andy is a graduate of Michigan State University’s Journalism School, where he focused on topics covered by the Knight Center for Environmental Journalism and wrote for the Great Lakes Echo. He was the 2008 and 2009 recipient of the Edward Meeman Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Student in Environmental Journalism at Michigan State.