COAL: While environmentalists have cheered the impending retirement of Pennsylvania’s Cheswick Generating Station, community members and their representatives worry about the ripple effects of losing dozens of steady jobs. (Trib Live)

NUCLEAR: The town of Wiscasset, Maine, is one of hundreds nationwide waiting in limbo for a federal strategy to handle their spent nuclear fuel. (Bangor Daily News)

NATURAL GAS:
The U.S. EPA investigates whether racism played a part in Philadelphia’s permitting of a natural gas plant in an already heavily polluted community of color. (WHYY)
A new Connecticut law requires electric distributors to solicit 30 MW of new fuel cell generation, but critics say the technology relies too heavily on natural gas to be considered renewable energy. (Energy News Network)

UTILITIES:
Over 1,000 gallons of a cable coolant leaked into New York’s New Rochelle Harbor from transmission lines owned by Con Edison, which says it’s responsible for the clean-up. (CBS New York)
Rhode Island consumer advocates intervene in the sale of National Grid’s Narragansett Electric division over a decades-old transmission agreement they say was never fulfilled by the utility. (NBC 10 WJAR)

SOLAR:
A transmission cost-shifting bill might have made Rhode Island ratepayers responsible for over $54 million in the near-term had the governor not vetoed the legislation, which aimed to address solar and wind transmission upgrade costs. (Providence Journal)
A New Hampshire-based manufacturer says its recently built .5 MW solar array will save the company $3.5 million over the installation’s lifetime. (Associated Press)
A New Hampshire grocers warehouse will host the state’s largest rooftop solar installation to date: a 1.3 MW array that will cover roughly one-fifth of the building’s energy needs. (Concord Monitor, subscription)

PIPELINES:
As the builder and owner of a Pennsylvania-Ohio pipeline fight in federal court over allegedly unpaid development costs, hundreds of property owners see millions of dollars worth of liens slapped on land for which they sold the rights-of-way. (Erie Times-News)
The most serious charges against two Pennsylvania constables related to their off-hours patrolling work for an Energy Transfer Partners pipeline were dropped; they were only found guilty of misdemeanor ethics charges. (Delaware County Daily Times)

GRID: Campaigners both for and against Maine’s power line expansion have spent $15.2 million this year on a related November ballot referendum. (Portland Press Herald)

WIND: Some community groups and environmentalists in New Jersey are leery of the state’s nascent offshore wind industry, alarmed by the scope and expense of the rapidly developing projects. (WHYY)