Northeast Energy News

Pennsylvania miners hesitate to embrace clean energy jobs

COAL: Many southwestern Pennsylvania coal miners still support President Trump and are skeptical of the transition to the clean energy economy. (StateImpact Pennsylvania)

CLIMATE: A New Jersey environmental official says activists should not prejudge proposed regulations designed to protect coastal development from climate change impacts. (NJ Spotlight)

PIPELINES: In a response to state lawmakers, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey says she will monitor a gas compressor station outside Boston and its impact on environmental justice communities. (WHDH)

EFFICIENCY:
The City of Boston and Eversource create an online resource center to connect building owners and managers with energy efficiency services. (Daily Energy Insider)
A National Guard training center in New Hampshire achieves near-net-zero energy use. (United States Army)

CLEAN ENERGY: A new poll in New Jersey shows residents support building wind and solar projects by a 2-1 margin over natural gas pipelines as a economic response to the pandemic. (news release)

SOLAR:
A western Massachusetts home has an elaborate Halloween display that is completely solar powered. (MassLive)
Three solar installations at municipal buildings on Cape Cod are expected to save the towns more than $100,000 annually in energy costs. (CapeCod.com)

POLITICS: Some Pennsylvania residents who suffer health or other ill effects from fracking will not support Joe Biden for president and will instead vote on cultural issues. (E&E News, subscription required)

COMMENTARY:
• The Maryland Clean Energy Center says it is poised to deliver innovations and expertise to help develop technologies for the new energy economy. (MarylandReporter.com)
• The developer of the Skipjack offshore wind project off Delaware says it will have no negative impact on tourism and the company will protect the environment wherever it ends up connecting to the power grid. (Cape Gazette)
• Environmentalists say New Jersey leaving PJM would put pressure on capacity prices for power and lead to power generators competing for state contracts. (NJ Spotlight)

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