Daily digest

Polling shows majority of Ohio voters oppose ‘bailout’ plans

UTILITIES: An Indiana utility wants regulatory approval for a fixed-rate increase of more than 80 percent as a way to ensure fairness among ratepayers, though utilities in other states are backing off the strategy. (Midwest Energy News)

OHIO:
• New polling shows “huge majorities” of Ohio voters are against the income-guarantee requests by FirstEnergy and AEP due to concerns about increased rates. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
In closed-door meetings, FirstEnergy has portrayed its income-guarantee request as “an attempt to stave off financial disaster.” (Columbus Dispatch)

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CLEAN POWER PLAN: With the right investments over the next decade, Xcel Energy says it is “nearly certain” its Minnesota operations will comply with the federal rules. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

COAL:
• Murray Energy CEO Robert Murray says his company could go bankrupt unless severance tax rates are slashed. (Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register)
Opposing groups have different redevelopment ideas for the site of a shuttered power plant in one Minnesota city. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• Energy companies are worried they won’t be able to weather the new moratorium on coal leases for public lands. (Associated Press)
One analysis says President Obama’s coal moratorium may have a bigger impact on climate change than the Clean Power Plan. (Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis)
Xcel Energy says its plans to close two units at one of its major coal plants in Minnesota will have a minimal effect on rates. (St. Cloud Times)

WIND: Researchers have developed a concept for 50-megawatt wind turbines with blades the length of two football fields. (Digital Trends)

PIPELINE: Michigan seeks public comment on a draft proposal for independent contractors who would perform risk analyses on the oil pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac. (Associated Press)

NUCLEAR: The U.S. Senate looks to prioritize using nuclear energy as a way to reduce carbon emissions. (Forbes)

BIOFUELS:
• Outside of Iowa, the federal ethanol mandate is losing favor among policy experts and clean-energy advocates. (New York Times)
A developer receives $4.2 million in tax incentives to build a new ethanol plant in southwest Iowa. (Associated Press)

CLIMATE: Money managers and Wall Street investors are now on “alert” about the impact climate change can have on stock prices. (ClimateWire)

SOLAR: With leftover funds from successfully fighting a coal-ash storage plan in Wisconsin, residents donate the money to a local school district to install solar panels. (LaCrosse Tribune)

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CONGRESS: While initial debate on sweeping energy legislation in the U.S. Senate has gone smoothly so far, contention may follow in the coming weeks. (E&E Daily)

COMMENTARY:
• FirstEnergy has become “the poster child for resistant utilities” hesitating to make clean energy investments. (Environmental Defense Fund)
An “energy revolution” won’t require sweeping legislation, but a series of strategic incentives and investments, many of which are already underway. (New York Times)
An objective, in-depth analysis of Ohio’s troubled electric system could be a “valuable public service.” (Columbus Dispatch)

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