Daily digest

Protesters move into direct path of Dakota Access pipeline

CLEAN ENERGY: Ohio would gain thousands of jobs and ratepayers would save millions on electric bills if the state increased its support for clean energy, according to a new report by environmental groups. (Columbus Dispatch)

SOLAR:
• The first of five solar sites that will generate 5.5 megawatts of electricity comes online in Iowa. (Radio Iowa)
• One of the newest solar projects in St. Cloud, Minnesota could be on cemetery property. (KNSI)

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CLIMATE: A Wisconsin city is introducing a climate change referendum that asks residents whether the local government should endorse a federal carbon fee and dividend program. (WKOW)

PIPELINES:
• Dakota Access pipeline protesters set up a new camp on private property they say belongs to Native Americans under a more than century-old treaty, moving into the project’s direct path for the first time. Local officials say they won’t be immediately removed due to a lack of manpower. (Associated Press)
• Police departments in Wisconsin, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Indiana and Nebraska are sending in extra officers to help manage Dakota Access protests. (Associated Press)
• Hacked emails show “debate and confusion” within Hillary Clinton’s campaign about her then-newfound position against building the Keystone XL pipeline. (Associated Press)

FRAC SAND: Local officials are scheduled to vote today on the future of frac sand mining in an eastern Minnesota county. (Winona Daily News)

OIL AND GAS: The U.S. EPA is seeking a headquarters-level discussion with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to “promote deeper, more comprehensive climate reviews of proposed natural gas pipelines.” (Greenwire) 

COAL: A decommissioned coal plant in southwestern Indiana may take on a second life as a shipping port. (Power Magazine)

VOLKSWAGEN SCANDAL: Missouri is ready to spend $8.7 million in settlement money from Volkswagen’s diesel emissions scandal on school transportation, paying off biodiesel subsidies and disaster response. (KSNF)

TRANSMISSION: A Wisconsin judge rules in favor of American Transmission Co., saying the company has the right to remove trees at a wildlife hospital and refuge. (RTO Insider)

COMMENTARY: Analysts see coal’s share of the U.S. energy mix dropping to less than 20 percent “in the not distant future.” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

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