CLIMATE: Gasoline and other energy prices are likely to spike as Russia invades Ukraine, redirecting climate conversations to fossil fuel affordability and leaving the Biden administration few options to combat the rise. (Politico, New York Times)

ALSO:
• Walmart, Amazon, and other major corporations are promising emission reductions while also making major donations to Republican attorneys general fighting climate action, a report finds. (Washington Post)
• Progressive Democrats and environmental advocates continue to press President Biden to declare a climate emergency. (Bloomberg)

EMISSIONS:
• The U.S. Supreme Court agrees to hear a case brought by 19 Republican-led states that challenges the EPA’s ability to issue regulations to curb carbon emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. (Guardian, Vox)
• Regulators are largely unaware how much gas is being flared and vented by U.S. producers due to limited federal oversight, lax enforcement and inconsistent data collection. (Inside Climate News)

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE:
• The federal government’s choice to leave race out of its tool to determine environmental justice communities hasn’t affected its ability to prioritize communities of color, an analysis finds. (Grist)
• After years of outreach by environmental justice advocates, Vermont state senators advance proposed rules to ensure environmental benefits and burdens are equitably distributed. (Energy News Network)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• The U.S. Postal Service finalizes a plan to purchase nearly 150,000 gasoline-powered delivery trucks, despite the Biden administration’s push for it to go electric. (Washington Post)
• Tesla proposes opening its charging network to other electric vehicles if it receives federal funding to keep building. (E&E News)
• Duke Energy proposes a North Carolina program letting some customers charge electric vehicles for a fixed monthly fee in return for allowing Duke to manage the charging to avoid grid stress. (Utility Dive)

OFFSHORE WIND: As the federal offshore wind leasing auction for parcels in New York and New Jersey waters brings in a record $1.5 billion in bids in its first day, experts suggest keeping an eye on the bidding companies and continued legal action from fishers. (Reuters, E&E News)

PIPELINES: Oil and gas pipeline companies are gearing up to build new projects or refurbish old lines to help move carbon dioxide to sequestration sites. (Reuters)

HYDROGEN: States are competing for a chunk of the $8 billion the federal government has set aside for ​“clean hydrogen hubs” in the U.S. (Canary Media)

OVERSIGHT: Utility regulators, attorneys general and ratepayer advocates from 14 states urge FERC to bar utilities from recouping political contributions and lobbying costs with consumers’ money. (Utility Dive)

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Kathryn Krawczyk

Kathryn brings her extensive editorial background to the Energy News Network team, where she oversees the early-morning production of ENN’s five email digest newsletters as well as distribution of ENN’s original journalism with other media outlets. From documenting chronic illness’ effect on college students to following the inner workings of Congress, Kathryn has built a broad experience in her more than five years working at major publications including The Week Magazine. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism and information management and technology from Syracuse University.