Southeast Energy News

Sabal Trail pipeline future unclear after court rejects rehearing request

PIPELINES: A federal court may shut down the Sabal Trail pipeline project after an appeals court refuses to revisit a ruling that FERC should have taken a closer look at the project’s climate impacts. (E&E News)

MORE:
• A federal judge stops a company’s plan to take possession of land in Virginia for the Mountain Valley Pipeline project until it proves landowners will be adequately compensated. (Associated Press)
• Virginia U.S. Senator Tim Kaine asks FERC to reconsider its approval of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline now that the commission is back a full staff. (McClatchy)
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The Atlantic Coast Pipeline comes with a $57.8 million environmental mitigation fund that could bring legal headaches to North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper. (News & Observer)

SOLAR:
• Duke Energy customers who rent their homes or have tree-shaded rooftops may get a chance to go solar under a new program filed with North Carolina regulators. (Southeast Energy News)
• An organization that calls itself a national consumer group actually works on behalf of oil, gas and coal companies and is urging Kentuckians to support a bill that would roll back incentives for solar power. (Courier Journal)
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A state-by-state analysis predicts how President Trump’s tariff on imported solar parts could harm solar growth. (Greentech Media)
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A Department of Energy program helps Florida communities reduce permit costs and cut red tape related to solar installation. (pv magazine)
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A Washington Post travel writer visits the nation’s first solar-powered town in southwest Florida.

COAL ASH: Legislation aimed at Dominion Energy’s plans to close coal ash ponds at four sites in Virginia moves from one Senate committee to another that is stacked with utility-friendly lawmakers. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

OFFSHORE DRILLING:
• North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein assembles attorneys general from 11 other coastal states and asks the Trump administration to cancel plans to expand offshore drilling. (News & Observer)
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There is cloudiness surrounding Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s announcement that Florida is exempt from new drilling plans and also a possibility that his statement harms the state. (WRLN, Tampa Bay Times)

NUCLEAR:
• Georgia regulators will not reconsider their decision allowing construction to continue at the troubled Vogtle nuclear plant. (WABE)
• Meanwhile, Georgia Power residential customers will see a drop in monthly electricity bills by an average of $2.70 because they will be paying $139 million less toward the Vogtle nuclear plant expansion. (Associated Press)
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An audit shows the Tennessee Valley Authority is still not complying with regulatory orders to address employee safety concerns at nuclear plants. (Knoxville News Sentinel)
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South Carolina lawmakers plan to question the state’s electric cooperatives to find out what the small power distributors knew about the now-failed Summer nuclear project. (Post and Courier)

CLIMATE: Officials are accepting proposals to elevate the lowest, most flood-prone road in a Florida Keys community, which would be the first such project in the Keys specifically designed for adaptation to future sea level rise. (Miami Herald)

COMMENTARY:
• The Atlantic Coast Pipeline approval is one of the worst environmental decisions made by North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper, a professor argues. (Winston-Salem Journal)
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West Virginia needs to pass a co-tenancy bill that will remove an impediment to natural gas drilling, says the Charleston Gazette-Mail editorial board.
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“Clean coal” is an oxymoron and there was no war on coal for President Trump to have ended, as he claims, says an opinion contributor. (WHYY)
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Removing a cap on solar energy could lead South Carolina out of its nuclear energy troubles, says the former chairman of the state Republican Party. (The State)

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