U.S. Energy News

Shutdown could delay offshore drilling plan

SHUTDOWN: The partial government shutdown risks delaying offshore drilling plans and ethanol blending changes, according to industry groups. (Reuters)

ALSO: Despite the shutdown, the Trump administration is making sure federal land managers in Alaska continue to work on efforts to open a local national wildlife refuge to drilling. (Alaska Energy Desk)

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EMISSIONS:
• A Virginia task force is expected to propose new regulations to limit methane leaks from landfills and natural gas infrastructure. (Energy News Network)
Minnesota is falling short of its emission-reduction goals due to increasing transportation emissions. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• The legal justification for the EPA’s plan to scrap Obama-era mercury standards traces back to a dissent written five years ago by Brett Kavanaugh. (E&E News)

COAL ASH: The Tennessee Valley Authority has awarded $200 million in contracts to Jacobs Engineering, the contracting company accused of poisoning hundreds of coal ash cleanup workers. (Knoxville News Sentinel)

CLEAN ENERGY: The chairman of the Michigan Public Service Commission says the state is in the midst of a “fundamental transition” toward clean energy as coal plants close. (Energy News Network)

SOLAR:
Clean energy developers have submitted “jaw dropping” low prices for six solar-plus-storage projects in Hawaii recently submitted to regulators for approval by the state’s largest electric utility. (Greentech Media)
• A Florida lawmaker files a bill to legalize power purchase agreements across the state, allowing property owners to sell solar energy. (Miami New Times)

WIND:
A Houston wind technician training program saw a 60 percent enrollment increase in 2018. (Denton Record-Chronicle)
Five developers tell New York officials they will submit bids in the state’s solicitation for 800 MW of offshore wind capacity. (Renewables Now)

PIPELINES:
• A Virginia state representative urges lawmakers to invest in renewable energy instead of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. (NBC 29)
An activist asks a judge to be dismissed from a federal racketeering lawsuit involving her participation in Dakota Access pipeline protests. (Associated Press)

OIL & GAS:
• Only 15 percent of oil and gas industry workers are female, so one woman launched an initiative to recruit more women. (CNBC)
• Jobs in the Texas oil fields drop for the first time in nearly two years. (Bloomberg)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
Customers have until the end of March to receive a full tax credit for buying electric General Motors models after the automaker passed 200,000 vehicle sales last year. (Detroit Free Press)
• In response to pickup truck drivers deliberately blocking Tesla chargers, a Model X owner shares a video of the car towing a large pickup truck. (Inc.)

GRID: Public comment on Illinois’ NextGrid plan, which outlines priorities for modernizing the state’s electric grid, is open until Thursday. (Energy News Network)

UTILITIES: California’s largest utility is considering filing for bankruptcy protection to guard against its growing wildfire liability. (Reuters)

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POLITICS: Former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke is the latest potential presidential candidate to support a Green New Deal. (Huffington Post)

COMMENTARY:
“Innovation” is the latest smokescreen for Republicans who oppose taking action against climate change, writes David Roberts. (Vox)
The New Jersey Sierra Club’s director explains why 57 community groups are calling for a moratorium on new fossil-fuel projects in the state. (Star-Ledger)

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