SOLAR: The U.S. Commerce Department is expected to investigate allegations that Chinese solar manufacturers have relocated production to avoid sanctions, with another set of tariffs on solar panel and cell imports to follow. (S&P Global)

ALSO:
• Solar companies contend tariffs on imported panels would threaten the U.S. solar industry and its chances of fighting climate change. (The Hill)
• A community solar project in a predominately Black Cleveland neighborhood seeks to be a model for building wealth in historically disadvantaged communities. (Energy News Network)
• Arizona utility Salt River Project announces plans to partner with a developer to build a 400 MW solar plus storage installation. (Associated Press) 

EMISSIONS: The EPA will finalize a rule today to curb the use and production of super-polluting hydroflourocarbons by 85% over the next 15 years. (Washington Post)

CLIMATE:
U.S. climate envoy John Kerry faces an enormous task of convincing other countries to commit to emissions cuts ahead of the COP26 conference. (New York Times)
• Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf releases a plan to cut the state’s emissions 80% by 2050, with provisions to increase building efficiency, reduce driving, and cut emissions from oil and gas operations. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

OIL & GAS:
• A group of U.S. House progressives condemn Democrats’ reconciliation bill for so far failing to repeal fossil fuel subsidies, while Sen. Ron Wyden says President Biden also wants to end the tax breaks. (The Hill)
Alaska’s Republican senators seek congressional allies to help block Democrats’ attempts to prohibit drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (E&E News)
• Experts predict Royal Dutch Shell’s sale of its Permian Basin assets will have little effect on employment and emissions given that buyer ConocoPhillips intends to continue operations. (Texas Tribune)
• PennEast drops plans to seize public lands in New Jersey for a controversial natural gas pipeline, though the company will not say whether it has abandoned the project entirely. (NJ Spotlight)
• A pipeline operator pleads guilty in federal court in North Dakota and will pay $36.3 million to settle criminal water pollution charges stemming from what prosecutors called the largest-ever land-based spill from oil drilling. (Reuters)

GRID:
A new pathway is emerging for corporations to cut carbon footprints by investing in emission-reducing projects with the biggest impact, regardless whether they are directly connected to their operations. (Canary Media)
• An investigation by ProPublica and NPR finds Entergy and its New Orleans subsidiary failed to take necessary steps to protect the power grid against outages, despite opportunities after several big hurricanes to increase resilience. (ProPublica/WWNO)
• Federal officials will present preliminary findings on last February’s Texas blackouts today in a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission meeting. (Houston Chronicle)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Ford and battery recycling company Redwood Materials are partnering to build a closed-loop supply chain for electric vehicle batteries, hopefully reducing mining demand and EV costs along the way. (Axios)

CLEAN ENERGY: Ohio Democrats plan to emphasize the potential economic benefits of a new bill calling for 100% clean energy by 2050 as they seek to gain support from Republican lawmakers. (Energy News Network)