U.S. Energy News

Solar developers stockpile panels before tax credit fades

SOLAR: The country’s largest solar developers are stockpiling solar panels before a 30% federal tax credit starts to phase out next year. (Reuters)

OFFSHORE WIND:
• New York awards two contracts to build 1,700 MW of offshore wind off Long Island, the largest such contracts in the U.S. to date. (New York Times)
• Massachusetts’ Vineyard Wind says its 800 MW offshore wind project is at risk if federal regulators delay an environmental impact statement more than six weeks. (CommonWealth Magazine)

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EMISSIONS: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signs the most ambitious greenhouse gas reduction law in the country. (Politico)

EFFICIENCY: A pilot program in Charlottesville, Virginia, pairs affordable housing vouchers with forgivable, city-funded loans that can be used to fund efficiency upgrades. (Energy News Network)

FINANCING: Property assessed clean energy loans are booming in Florida, but so are complaints from property owners. (Wall Street Journal, subscription)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Longer range, more choices, and better prices will help electric vehicles overtake gasoline-powered cars in the coming decades, experts say. (CNN)

NUCLEAR: A Utah cooperative says it has enough power-purchase agreements to begin pursuing a license for what would be the first small modular reactor in the U.S. (Associated Press)

COAL:
Virginia, North Carolina, and the federal government sue Duke Energy for environmental damage from the 2014 Dan River coal ash spill. (Associated Press)
The Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign secures a 2028 closure date for 1,300 MW of capacity at an Indiana coal plant. (S&P Global)
• More insurers are refusing to underwrite or invest in mining or utility companies with major stakes in coal. (Axios)

OIL & GAS:
• A panel of judges will hear two appeals from oil companies challenging lawsuits by cities suing the companies for climate damages. (E&E News)
• The refinery explosion in Philadelphia last month is the latest in a string of incidents around the country that put the public at risk from exposure to the deadly chemical hydrogen fluoride. (NPR)
• A study of Colorado infants finds that mothers living near intense oil and gas activity are more likely to have children with heart defects. (Houston Chronicle)

PIPELINES:
• North Dakota sues the federal government to recover $38 million the state spent policing protests against the Dakota Access pipeline. (Associated Press)
• An indigenous leader in Michigan who has led opposition to the Line 5 pipeline is now a consultant for Enbridge. (Michigan Radio)

OFFSHORE DRILLING: The federal government will hold a lease sale Aug. 21 to open 77.8 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas development. (Associated Press)

RENEWABLES: A bipartisan group of lawmakers reintroduces legislation to speed permitting for renewable energy projects on public lands in certain areas. (E&E News, subscription)

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UTILITIES:
• Critics say a Colorado energy provider, under pressure from members to provide more clean energy, is trying to subvert state climate goals and avoid oversight. (E&E News)
The number of electric utility rate cases nationally in 2018 increased to 89, the largest number since 1983. (U.S. Energy Information Administration)

COMMENTARY:
• An author and conservationist says the case for drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is not based on national emergency or economic needs, but out of spite. (New York Times)
• The size and diversity of New York’s economy makes its commitment to reducing climate pollution especially significant, an environmental organization says. (Environmental Defense Fund)

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