U.S. Energy News

Solar groups call for changes to diversify workforce

SOLAR: A solar industry study released today shows the U.S. solar workforce continues to lack diversity, though hiring and recruiting changes are helping some companies improve. (Energy News Network)

ALSO:
Advocates in Illinois call for new legislation to address shortcomings with a 2016 law they say was too little, too late to address equity and diversity gaps in the state’s clean energy sector. (Energy News Network)
Vermont is steering solar development to brownfields and former landfills in an effort to preserve farmland and rural landscapes. (Energy News Network)

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RENEWABLES: A founder of an organization focused on energy independence for Native Americans talks about the challenges of scaling renewable energy systems in their communities. (The Revelator)

WIND: Dominion Energy expects to begin construction in the coming weeks on its offshore wind test project off the coast of Virginia. (Kallanish Energy)

NUCLEAR:
• Conservative groups in Ohio criticize a proposed bill to bail out two FirstEnergy nuclear plants as “corporate welfare.” (Energy News Network)
A congressional field hearing outside Pittsburgh discussed how nuclear power is important in limiting carbon emissions. (StateImpact Pennsylvania)

COAL: With or without the Green New Deal, Kentucky’s economy is shifting away from coal. (Courier Journal)

OIL & GAS:
A U.S. House panel will study a proposal by Sen. Elizabeth Warren to ban drilling on public lands. (The Hill)
• A Montana U.S. Senator accuses the Interior Department of undermining a tribe’s efforts to prevent drilling near Glacier National Park. (Associated Press)
Environmentalists say the Trump administration’s plan to open 1 million acres in California to fracking is dangerous to humans and nearby national parks. (CNBC)

PIPELINES:
• Dominion Energy says it plans to resume work on the Atlantic Coast Pipeline in the third quarter of this year. (Reuters)
• Court delays will prevent the Keystone XL pipeline from being built in 2019. (Associated Press)
• A federal judge sends back to state court a lawsuit alleging Greenpeace conspired against the Dakota Access pipeline. (Associated Press)

TRANSMISSION:
Residents in remote parts of western Maine say their lives will be forever changed if a planned transmission line from Canada is built. (Press Herald)
Environmental groups are at odds with each other over a proposed transmission line in Wisconsin. (RTO Insider)

GRID: California is considering once again purchasing power for its residents as the state’s major utilities face wildfire-fueled bankruptcy threats. (Bloomberg)

STORAGE: Old electric vehicle batteries can be reused for energy storage, according to a new report. (E&E News, subscription)

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POLITICS: Democratic hopeful Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington announces his ambitious plan to fight climate change which calls for phasing out coal and gasoline-powered cars over the next decade. (New York Times)

COMMENTARY:
To curb dangerous air pollution and fight climate change, California needs to “electrify everything on wheels” as quickly as possible and continue to reduce carbon from fuels, says former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the former state senate president. (Sacramento Bee)
• An officer with the American Conservation Coalition says clean energy can align with conservative principles. (The Hill)
• Dominion Energy is misleading customers with its claims about being a solar energy leader, says a Sierra Club representative. (Virginia Mercury)

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